Home > The EYE-BALL Movie Zone > EYE-BALL MovieZone – Best Picture Oscar Nominated Movies – 1965

EYE-BALL MovieZone – Best Picture Oscar Nominated Movies – 1965

November 7, 2011
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Oscar Movies 1965:
EYE-BALL MovieZone1965 Nominees:

[Oscar Best Picture Winner - highlighted - click Nominee Movie links provided to navigate your way up and down the page - each Movie has additional links to Bit Torrent 'downloads' links, Wikipedia Links for all the information about the nominated movie, and the EYE-BALL MovieZone Reviews and ratings. Movie posters appearing at this site have been copied from Wikipedia and other research related source sites.]

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1965 -

“The Sound of Music”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Rodgers and Hammerstein’s The Sound of Music is a 1965 American musical film directed by Robert Wise and starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The film is based on the Broadway musical The Sound of Music, with songs written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, and with the musical book written by the writing team of Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse. Ernest Lehman wrote the screenplay.

The musical originated with the book The Story of the Trapp Family Singers by Maria von Trapp. It contains many popular songs, including “Edelweiss”, “My Favorite Things”, “Climb Ev’ry Mountain”, “Do-Re-Mi”, “Sixteen Going on Seventeen”, and “The Lonely Goatherd”, as well as the title song.

The movie version was filmed on location in Salzburg, Austria; Bavaria in Southern Germany; and at the 20th Century Fox Studios in California. It was photographed in 70mm Todd-AO by Ted D. McCord. It won a total of five Academy Awards including Best Picture in 1965 and is one of the most popular musicals ever produced. The cast album was nominated for a Grammy Award for Album of the Year.

Adjusted for inflation, it made $1.046 billion domestically (at 2010 prices), putting it third on the list of all-time inflation-adjusted box office hits, behind Gone with the Wind and Star Wars.[3] In 2001, the United States Library of Congress selected the film for preservation in the National Film Registry as it was deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

EYE-BALL MovieZoneMaria (Julie Andrews) is found in a pasture, exulting in the musical inspiration she finds there (“The Sound of Music”). Maria is a postulant in Nonnberg Abbey, where she is constantly getting into mischief and is the nuns’ despair (“Maria”).

Maria’s life suddenly changes when a widowed Austrian Navy Captain, Georg von Trapp (Christopher Plummer) writes to the abbey asking for a governess for his seven children. Mother Abbess (Peggy Wood) asks Maria to take the position on a probationary basis; previous governesses though, have not lasted long. She is worried about what awaits her at the von Trapp household, but is determined to succeed (“I Have Confidence”).

Maria, upon arrival at the von Trapp estate, finds that the Captain keeps it in strict shipshape order, blows a whistle, issues orders, and dresses his children in sailor-suit uniforms. While they are initially hostile to her, they warm to her when she comforts them during a thunderstorm (“My Favorite Things”). Liesl (Charmian Carr), the oldest, who is “Sixteen Going on Seventeen”, sneaks into Maria’s window after a secret meeting with a messenger boy, Rolfe (Daniel Truhitte). At first she is adamant that she “doesn’t need a governess”, but Maria offers to be her friend, and she acquiesces. Maria teaches them how to sing (“Do-Re-Mi”) and to play, sewing playclothes for them from discarded drapes in her room.

EYE-BALL MovieZoneThe Captain entertains a visit from a lady friend, Baroness Elsa Schraeder (Eleanor Parker), a wealthy socialite from Vienna, along with mutual friend Max Detweiler (Richard Haydn), who is intent on finding an obscure musical act to launch at the upcoming Salzburg Music Festival. The Captain becomes aware that Maria has been taking the children on picnics and bicycle rides, climbed trees with them, and taken them in a boat on the lake adjoining his estate. When the boat capsizes, Maria and all of the children (wearing their clothes made from the former curtains) fall into the water. The Captain turns his wrath on her and Maria begs him to pay attention to the children and love them, but he orders her to return to the abbey.

When he discovers the children performing a reprise of “The Sound of Music” for the Baroness, he changes his mind. Maria has brought music back into his home, and he begs her to stay. Things get better at the household. She and the children perform a puppet show (“The Lonely Goatherd”) that Max gave to them. He announces that he has entered the children in the Salzburg Festival; the Captain, however, forbids their participation. Maria and the children insist that he sing a song, knowing that he used to play and sing with a guitar, and he agrees (“Edelweiss”).

At a soiree thrown in Baroness Schraeder’s honor, eleven-year-old Kurt observes guests dancing the Laendler, and asks Maria to teach him the steps. The Captain cuts in and partners her in a graceful performance, culminating in a close clinch. At that moment, she breaks off and blushes. The children perform “So Long, Farewell” to say goodnight to the guests, receiving enthusiastic applause. The Baroness, jealous of Maria, convinces her to return to Nonnberg.

Maria leaves the estate and returns to the abbey, where she keeps herself in seclusion until Mother Abbess gently confronts her, urging her to “Climb Ev’ry Mountain” in search of God’s will for her. At this command, she returns to the von Trapp family, finding that the Captain is now engaged to the Baroness. However, he breaks off the engagement, realizing that he is in love with Maria. He meets Maria in his gazebo and they declare their love for each other (“Something Good”). The two wed in an elaborate ceremony at the Salzburg Cathedral, with many of Austria’s elite, as well as the nuns from Nonnberg Abbey, in attendance.

While the new couple is away on their honeymoon in Paris, Max grooms the children to perform in the Salzburg Music Festival, against the Captain’s wishes. At the same time, Austria is annexed into the Third Reich in the Anschluss (actual date was March 12, 1938). When the Captain returns, he is informed that he must report as soon as possible to the Nazi Naval Headquarters in Bremerhaven, to accept a commission in the German Navy. He is opposed to Nazism, and stalls by insisting he must perform with his family that night in the Salzburg Festival, now politicized and showcased as a Nazi event under the patronage of Hans Zeller (Ben Wright), recently appointed as the Nazi Gauleiter. Zeller agrees, but orders the Captain to depart immediately after the performance. The choreography of the final song, “So Long, Farewell”, allows the family to leave slowly, a few at a time, and as the winners are announced, they flee. At first they hide in the abbey, but are discovered by Rolfe (who had joined the Nazi party) and flee again. The Nazis are unable to pursue them, as the nuns have stolen their spark plug wires and ignition coil. The final shot shows the von Trapps climbing over the Alps into Switzerland, as “Climb Ev’ry Mountain”, reprised by a choir, swells to a grand conclusion.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Where do you start to review what you think to be the best movie every made – from 1928 – 2011 – some 83 years of Best Picture Nominated Movies, EYE-BALL MovieZone rates this movie the best of the lot with a 9.5/10 rating.  Even 50 odd years after its release – it is as entertaining as it was when it first hit movie screens – the characters are ageless – the music forever young – the plot and concept where ‘good v evil’ and the history of Nazi memories – will always make this story a hit with the world.

Julie Andrews brings her magical voice to a Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical tale and the music made the movie.  From the sweeping hills in the opening scenes to the ‘Edelweiss’ at the end of the movie – viewers are enthralled by both story and the music of Austria …

This movie was the last of the truly great musicals ever made – and quickly on the heels of “My Fair Lady” – Best Picture winner 1964.

Highly recommended – a much watch every year with the family movie – and of course the Nuns – Nuns always bring an additional element to a movie – always a positive and always a distraction …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 9.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1965

“Darling”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Darling is a 1965 British comedy/drama film written by Frederic Raphael, directed by John Schlesinger, and starring Julie Christie, Dirk Bogarde, and Laurence Harvey. It is considered one of Schlesinger’s best films and an insightful satire of mid-sixties British culture. It was a breakout role for young actress Julie Christie, who, much like her character Diana, went on to become an international star.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Darling tells the story of a bored young married woman named Diana Scott (Julie Christie) who drifts up the social and economic ladders of modern society without really knowing what she wants. Initially she draws the attention of a television journalist (Dirk Bogarde) and they both leave their spouses to begin an affair. After growing increasingly bored with this relationship, she begins working as a television and print model and minor actress, this work bringing her into the orbit of a cynical ad executive (Laurence Harvey). Eventually, both relationships fall apart, but while shooting a television commercial in Italy, she meets an aging, widowed Italian prince (Jose Luis de Villalonga) with several children and marries him. The marriage proves unsatisfactory, but she eventually discovers that there is no way out . . .

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

This movie had no right ro be Best Picture nominated – it’s a rambling self narrated story about a woman struggling with choices she makes – her life was never interesting to start with from a story perspective and it never got any better.

Bogarde and Christie offer perhaps the worst performances of their career – the plot is downright boring – its made in B&W in the mid sixties when everything was done in colour – and the direction and setting choices are all done on the cheap …

Would not waste your time in a recommendation …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 1.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1965

“Dr Zhivago”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Doctor Zhivago (Russian: До́ктор Жива́го) is a 1965 epic drama-romance-war film directed by David Lean and loosely based on the famous novel of the same name by Boris Pasternak. It has remained popular for decades, and as of 2010 is the eighth highest grossing film of all time in the United States, adjusted for inflation

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The film takes place, for the most part, during the tumultuous period of 1912–1923, the years which included World War I, the Russian Revolution and Russian Civil War, as the regime of Tsar Nicholas II was overthrown and the Soviet Union established. A framing device, from which the film is narrated, takes place some time in the late 1940s to early 1950s, though a specific date is never mentioned.

The film’s framing device involves the KGB Lieutenant General Yevgraf Andreyevich Zhivago (Alec Guinness) searching for the illegitimate child of his half brother, poet and doctor Yuri Andreyevich Zhivago (Omar Sharif), and his mistress Larissa (“Lara”) Antipova (Julie Christie). (It is briefly mentioned that Yuri Andreyevich’s “Lara poems” are finally back in print after being banned for some time.) Yevgraf believes a young woman named Tonya Komarovskaya (Rita Tushingham) working on a dam project may be his niece. Around 1950, Yevgraf narrates the story for her, periodically appearing in it, though he rarely interacts with any other characters (and never speaks except in voice-over) in the flashbacks.

Yevgraf tells Tonya the story of her father’s life. Yuri Zhivago’s father abandons the family and Yuri’s mother dies when he is a child, leaving him only a balalaika. Left destitute, Yuri is taken in by his mother’s friends, the Gromekos—Alexander ‘Sasha’ (Ralph Richardson) and Anna (Siobhán McKenna)—and their daughter Tonya (Geraldine Chaplin). Gromeko is a retired medical professor living in Moscow. As a result, years later in 1913, Zhivago is able to enter medical school, studying under Professor Boris Kurt (Geoffrey Keen). Though he is already a poet of some renown, Yuri does not think he can support a family as a poet and decides to become a doctor. Lara, meanwhile, lives with her mother (Adrienne Corri), a dressmaker who is being “advised” by Victor Ipolitovich Komarovsky (Rod Steiger), a corrupt attorney, who was a friend and business partner of Zhivago’s father. Lara becomes engaged to Pavel Pavlovich (“Pasha”) Antipov (Tom Courtenay). Originally an idealistic social democrat (Lara teasingly calls him “an awful prig”), Pasha drifts into Left-wing extremism after being wounded by sabre-wielding Cossacks during a peaceful protest. This leaves him with a conspicuous scar across his cheek which marks him for life. The same evening, Komarovsky takes Lara to an expensive restaurant and seduces her. After Lara returns home, Pasha shows up at Lara’s home, revealing his scarred face to Lara and tells her to hide a Smith & Wesson revolver that he picked up at the demonstration, telling her to hide it and shoot any capitalists in revenge for the massacre of the demonstrators.

Lara becomes more deeply involved with Komarovsky, until her mother finally discovers their affair. As a result of the discovery, Lara’s mother tries to commit suicide by swallowing iodine. Komarovsky discovers her and summons help from Kurt and his assistant Zhivago, who thus sees Lara for the first time. When Pasha, now a dedicated Bolshevik, informs Komarovsky of his intentions to marry Lara, Komarovsky is not amused. He tries to dissuade Lara from marrying Pasha, and then rapes her. In revenge, Lara takes a pistol she has been concealing for Pasha, tracks Komarovsky to a Christmas Eve party and shoots him. Komarovsky is not killed but only shot in the arm. Although the diners wish to notify the police, Komarovsky insists that no action be taken against Lara, who is escorted out by Pasha. Yuri, who is also present at the party, sees Pasha. Although enraged and devastated by Lara’s infidelity, Pasha cannot bring himself to strike her. Komarovsky’s wound is treated by Yuri. Komarovsky tells Yuri that he had known his father Andreyevich. In the aftermath, Pasha marries Lara and they have a daughter, Katya Antipova.

The movie then moves ahead to the outbreak of World War I in 1914. Yevgraf Zhivago reveals that he is a Russian Social Democratic Labour Party member when narrating, intending to subvert the Imperial Russian Army for Vladimir Lenin’s Bolsheviks. Yuri, who is by this time married to Tonya Gromeko, becomes a battlefield doctor along the Eastern Front. Leaving his wife and his daughter, Pasha Antipov joins a volunteer regiment (“Happy men don’t volunteer,” Yevgraf is heard to say in voice-over), according to Yevgraf, Pasha became a trusted man to his comrades, then as Yevgraf continues narrating, the film shows corpses of Russian and German soldiers on frozen empty World War I battlefields. Then in the winter of 1915, the army unit that Pasha is in, has half of the troops unarmed with their boots and greatcoats worn out. The officer (which Yevgraf described as who the soldiers didn’t trust) keeps ordering the troops to charge but all of them refuse to. But as Pasha grabs a Mosin-Nagant rifle and jumps out of the trench, encouraging the soldiers to advance, the soldiers, thinking that Pasha senses that they are safe to advance, charge out of the trench. As Pasha and the troops continue charging, he gets hit by German artillery fire and seemingly gets killed in action, dropping his glasses into the snow. However, he is declared missing in action. Lara enlists as a nurse in order to search for him. Meanwhile, the February Revolution breaks out and the soldiers begin to kill their officers and desert en masse. Travelling with a group of deserters, Lara again encounters Zhivago, who is with a column of replacement troops marching to the front. Zhivago enlists the help of Lara to tend to the wounded. The two manage a makeshift hospital in a nearby dacha for the remainder of the war and are parted after the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk.

After the war, Yuri returns to Moscow, learns that his mother-in-law has died and that the Gromekos’ house has been divided into tenements by the new Soviet government. Yuri meets his son Sasha for the first time since the boy was an infant, and resumes his old job at the local hospital. Angered that his family lacks firewood for the family stove, one night Yuri steals wood from a fence, where he is spotted by his half-brother, Yevgraf, who is working for the CHEKA. Yevgraf follows him home, identifies himself, and informs Zhivago that his poems have been condemned by Soviet censors as antagonistic to Communism. After explaining that this puts their whole family at risk for collective punishment, Yevgraf helps arrange for rail passes for their transport to the Gromeko estate at Varykino, in the Ural Mountains.

Zhivago, Tonya, Sasha and Alexander board a heavily-guarded cattle train which contains a detachment of labour conscripts bound for the gulag—including the hot-headed dissident anarchist intellectual, Kostoyed Amoursky (Klaus Kinski)—and a large contingent of Red Guards. At one point, the train passes through the village of Mink, which has been shelled by Red forces commanded by People’s Commissar Strelnikov, with one old woman from the village taken onto the train with a dead infant. As the train stopped somewhere near the Urals, an armoured train adorned with red flags passes by as the Bolshevik sailors and the old woman saying that the armoured train is Strelnikov’s, with Strelnikov standing at the back of the armoured train. In a closeup on his face, it reveals that Strelnikov is actually Pasha, who is apparently alive. While the Urals train is stopped in the Urals, Zhivago wanders away from the train, listens to the sound of a waterfall, and stumbles across Strelnikov’s armoured train sitting on a hidden siding. Believing that Yuri is about to assassinate the Commissar, the Red Guards arrest him and bring him before Strelnikov. To his amazement, Yuri immediately recognises the Commissar as Pasha Antipov, now an anti-Revisionist, whom he recognized at the Christmas eve party back in 1913. After a tense conversation, Strelnikov informs Yuri that Lara is alive in the town of Yuriatin—which is then occupied by the anti-Communist White Army. He then allows Zhivago to return to his family. A casual comment by the guard who takes Zhivago back to his train reveals that most people interrogated by Strelnikov end up being shot by angrily saying “you’re lucky”.

Zhivago’s family arrives at Varykino, only to learn that their house has been boarded up with a sign indicating confiscation by the Soviet State, a.k.a. “the people”. Out of fear of being executed as “counter-revolutionaries”, they refrain from breaking into their own house and decide to occupy the smaller guest cottage. The family lives a mundane life until the next spring, when Zhivago goes into nearby Yuriatin and finds that Lara is still living there with Katya, and working as a librarian. The two reacquaint themselves and surrender to their longtime feelings, beginning an extra-marital affair. Zhivago feels deeply ashamed and is torn between Tonya and Lara, until Tonya becomes pregnant. Therefore, Yuri travels to Yuriatin and breaks off his relationship with Lara, only to be abducted and conscripted into service by Communist partisans under Liberius (Gérard Tichy) while riding back to Varykino. In the Partisans, Zhivago had experiences that were unacceptable to him, including seeing the Partisans firing at an advancing squad of the White Army’s St. Michael’s Military School Cadets who were lead by one of Liberius’ adversaries, and the Partisan cavalry charging across a frozen river in the winter only to be met by a machine gun. After serving with the Partisans for nearly two years, Zhivago deserts, walking through the snow to Yuriatin in an attempt to reach Varykino, but learns that Tonya and her father have “gone away — there’s no one at Varykino”. He makes his way to Lara’s flat, where the two lovers rekindle their relationship; she tells him that Tonya, her father, and Sasha have emigrated to Paris. Later she gives him a letter from Tonya, in which Tonya tells him that she’s given birth to a daughter, admitting at the end, “I must honestly admit that {Lara} Antipova is a good person.”

However, Komarovsky arrives one night and informs them that they are being watched by the CHEKA, due to Lara’s marriage to Commissar Strelnikov (who has fallen from favour with the Soviet State) and Yuri’s “counter-revolutionary” poetry and desertion. Komarovsky offers Yuri and Lara his help in leaving Russia, but they refuse. Instead, they go, with Lara’s daughter Katya, to the Varykino estate, which has been left open and is frozen inside. Yuri begins writing the “Lara” poems, which later make him famous but incur government displeasure. Komarovsky reappears and tells Yuri that Strelnikov had been arrested and had committed suicide while being taken to his execution. Therefore, Lara is in immediate danger, as the CHEKA had only left her free to lure Strelnikov into the open. Zhivago scoffs at this, but Komarovsky informs him that Strelnikov had been arrested on the road only five miles from Varykino. Yuri agrees to send Lara away with Komarovsky, who has been appointed as Minister of Justice to the White government of Baron Ungern von Sternberg in Mongolia. Refusing to leave with a man he despises, Yuri remains behind.

Years later during the Stalinist era, Yuri returns destitute to Moscow, where Yevgraf, now an NKVD Polkovnik, obtains for him a hospital job and buys him some new clothes. While travelling on a tram to his first day at work, Yuri sees a woman whom he recognises as Lara. Forcing his way off the tram, he runs after her, but suffers a fatal heart attack before she can see or notice him, as many other pedestrians see him pass out and rush towards him. Although he is denied an official funeral by the Soviet State, Yuri’s poetry is already being published openly due to shifts in politics and his funeral is well-attended. Among the mourners is Lara, who is surprised and deeply saddened by her beloved’s death. She approaches Yevgraf and informs him that she has given birth to Yuri’s daughter, but has become separated from her in the collapse of the Baron’s Government in Mongolia. After vainly looking over hundreds of orphans with Yevgraf’s help, Lara disappears off the street during Joseph Stalin’s Great Purge. “She died or vanished somewhere, in one of the labour camps,” recalls Yevgraf, “A nameless number, on a list that was afterwards mislaid.”

When Yevgraf starts retelling Yuri’s story, Zhivago’s mother dies and he inherits her balalaika. His adoptive father informs him that his mother had a gift. The theme of artistic talent is repeated throughout the film, as Zhivago becomes a poet of great renown. At the end, set at a hydroelectric dam during the mid-1950s, Yevgraf is growing more and more convinced the young girl Tonya Komarovskaya is Yuri’s and Lara’s daughter, but she is reluctant to believe it: “I can’t be of any use to them now, can I?” Yevgraf offers, “I was hoping I might be of some use to you.” The girl ends the meeting, promising that she will “think about it”, and leaves with her boyfriend, a dam operator. While walking away, the girl slings a balalaika over her shoulder, which catches the eye of Yevgraf. He calls out to her, “Tonya, can you play the balalaika?” Her boyfriend responds, “Can she play? She is an artist!” “Who taught you?” Yevgraf asks. “No one taught her.” Yevgraf smiles and comments, “Ah, then, it’s a gift.”

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

There were only two movies in contention for Best Picture in 1965 – both were worth  Best Picture winner in any other year.  The story is long and slow – but the plot is deep and transfixing.

Up against “The Sound of Music” – no other movie had a chance – this movie won 5 Academy Awards – the same number as “The Sound of Music” – yet the difference between the two movies is the width of the Pacific ocean …

A must have in your movie collection -

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 7.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1965

“Ship Of Fools”

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Ship of Fools is a 1965 film drama which tells the overlapping stories of several passengers aboard an ocean liner bound to Germany from Mexico in 1933. It stars Vivien Leigh, Simone Signoret, José Ferrer, Lee Marvin, Oskar Werner, Michael Dunn, Elizabeth Ashley, George Segal, José Greco and Heinz Rühmann.

The movie was adapted by Abby Mann from the novel of the same name by Katherine Anne Porter. It was directed by Stanley Kramer.

It was to be Vivien Leigh’s last film and Christiane Schmidtmer’s first US production. The Fat Man was portrayed by Henry Calvin, who was known for starring on Walt Disney’s television series Zorro as Sergeant Demetrio Lopez Garcia. Lt. Huebner was portrayed by Werner Klemperer, who was best known for his portrayal of Colonel Wilhelm Klink in the 1965-1971 CBS television comedy, Hogan’s Heroes.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

A pastiche of characters board a German ocean liner in Vera Cruz, Mexico, for a voyage to Bremerhaven, Germany, along with a group of workers in steerage and a not-so-exotic band of entertainers, for whom the voyage is just a job. Some are happy to be bound for a rising Nazi Germany, some are apprehensive, while others appear oblivious to its potential dangers.

The ship’s doctor, Schumann, takes a special interest in La Condesa, a countess from Spain who has an addiction to drugs and is being shipped to a German-run prison. Her sense of certain doom is contrasted by the doctor’s determination to fight the forces of oppression, embodied by his insistence that the people in steerage be treated like human beings rather than animals. The doctor himself has a secret, a terminal heart condition, and his sympathy for the countess soon evolves into love.

Several passengers are invited to dine each night at the captain’s table. There, some are amused and others offended by the Anti-Semitic rants of a German businessman named Rieber (Jose Ferrer). The Jewish Lowenthal is invited instead to join a dwarf named Glocken for his meals, and the two bond over their exclusion. Eventually a passenger named Freytag seems shocked to find himself ostrasized when Rieber learns that his wife is Jewish.

Others aboard include a young American couple, painter David and girlfriend Jenny, who bicker because David is unhappy at his own lack of success. A divorcee, Mary Treadwell, drinks and flirts, on a quest to recapture her youth in Paris. Bill Tenny is a former baseball player disappointed in the way his career never quite took off. They are distracted by the music and the professional dancers, whose flirtations seem to skirt the edges of solicitation, or dive right in to the seedy side of oblivion.

And when the passengers disembark, two are no longer with them — the countess, who has been taken to an island prison, and the doctor, who has died.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Movie not Viewed and therefore Un-Rated – that is disappointing as all the reviews read indicate it is a good movie. Unable to find a downloadable copy …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: Un-Rated …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1965

“A Thousand Clowns”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

A Thousand Clowns is a 1962 American play by Herb Gardner, which tells the story of a young boy who lives with his eccentric uncle Murray, who is forced to conform to society in order to keep custody of the boy. A 1965 movie version was adapted from the play by Gardner and directed by Fred Coe. Gardner based the Murray Burns character on his friend, Jean Shepherd, who is said not to have appreciated the gesture

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Unemployed television writer Murray Burns (Jason Robards), lives in a cluttered New York City one-bedroom apartment with his 12-year-old nephew, Nick (Barry Gordon). Murray has been unemployed for five months after walking out on his previous job, writing jokes for a children’s television show called “Chuckles the Chipmunk”. Nick, the illegitimate son of Murray’s sister, was left with Murray seven years earlier.

When Nick writes a school assignment on the benefits of unemployment insurance, his school sends social workers to investigate his living conditions. Confronted by investigators for the Child Welfare Board, Sandra Markowitz (Barbara Harris) and her superior and boyfriend Albert Amundson (William Daniels), Murray is threatened with removal of the child from his custody unless he can prove he is a capable guardian of Nick.

Murray charms and seduces Sandra, who convinces Murray to obtain employment. They begin a relationship. Although Murray tries to avoid returning to work, he finds himself in a dilemma: if he wishes to keep his nephew, he must swallow his dignity and go back to work; on the other hand, he can’t let go of Nick until he thinks the boy has shown some backbone; he “wants a little guts to show.” In a confrontation with his brother and agent Arnold (Martin Balsam), Murray states his nonconformist worldview. Arnold rejoins that his own goal, by contrast, is to be “the best possible Arnold Burns”.

Murray realizes that he must get a job, and after walking out on several interviews, he agrees to meet his former employer the detested “Chuckles” host, Leo Herman (Gene Saks). Leo insults Nick, but Murray refuses to do anything, upsetting Nick. But Nick stands up to Leo, telling Leo he is the fool that he so obviously is, and Murray sees the boy has finally grown a backbone; the guts have shown. At that point Murray becomes able to join the crowds of people heading to their jobs. He knows Nick has come of age.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Robards is brilliant in his portrayal as an out of work funny-man.  It begins slowly but when the origins of his having a nephew living with him are revealed the journey the movie pursues is both comical and drama worth watching.

Recommended Viewing …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.0/10 …

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