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EYE-BALL MovieZone – Oscar Movies 1962…

October 25, 2011
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Oscar Movies 1962:
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1962 Nominees:

[Oscar Best Picture Winner – highlighted – click Nominee Movie links provided to navigate your way up and down the page – each Movie has additional links to Bit Torrent ‘downloads’ links, Wikipedia Links for all the information about the nominated movie, and the EYE-BALL MovieZone Reviews and ratings. Movie posters appearing at this site have been copied from Wikipedia and other research related source sites.]

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1962

“Lawrence of Arabia”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Lawrence of Arabia is a 1962 British film based on the life of T. E. Lawrence. It was directed by David Lean and produced by Sam Spiegel through his British company, Horizon Pictures, with the screenplay by Robert Bolt and Michael Wilson. The film stars Peter O’Toole in the title role. It is widely considered one of the greatest and most influential films in the history of cinema. The dramatic score by Maurice Jarre and the Super Panavision 70 cinematography by Freddie Young are also highly acclaimed.

The film depicts Lawrence’s experiences in Arabia during World War I, in particular his attacks on Aqaba and Damascus and his involvement in the Arab National Council. Its themes include Lawrence’s emotional struggles with the personal violence inherent in war, his personal identity, and his divided allegiance between his native Britain and its army and his newfound comrades within the Arabian desert tribes.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Act I

In 1935, T. E. Lawrence (Peter O’Toole) is killed in a motorcycle accident. At his memorial service at St Paul’s Cathedral, reporters try to gain insights into this remarkable, enigmatic man from those who knew him, with little success.

During the First World War, Lawrence is a misfit British Army lieutenant stationed in Cairo, notable only for his insolence and knowledge of the Bedouin. Over the objections of General Murray (Donald Wolfit), he is sent by Mr. Dryden (Claude Rains) of the Arab Bureau to assess the prospects of Prince Faisal (Alec Guinness) in his revolt against the Turks.

On the journey, his Bedouin guide is killed by Sherif Ali (Omar Sharif) for drinking from a well without permission. Lawrence later meets Colonel Brighton (Anthony Quayle), who orders him to keep quiet, make his assessment of Faisal’s camp, and leave. Lawrence promptly ignores Brighton’s commands when he meets Faisal. His knowledge and outspokenness pique the prince’s interest.

Brighton advises Faisal to retreat after a major defeat, but Lawrence proposes a daring surprise attack on Aqaba. While strongly fortified against a naval assault, the town is lightly defended on the landward side. It would provide a port from which the British could offload much-needed supplies. He convinces Faisal to provide fifty men, led by a sceptical Sherif Ali. Two teenage orphans, Daud (John Dimech) and Farraj (Michel Ray), attach themselves to Lawrence as his servants.

They cross the Nefud Desert, considered impassable even by the Bedouins, travelling day and night on the last stage to reach water. Gasim (I. S. Johar) succumbs to fatigue and falls off his camel unnoticed during the night. The rest make it to an oasis, but Lawrence turns back for the lost man alone, risking his own life. When he rescues Gasim, he wins over Sherif Ali.

Lawrence persuades Auda abu Tayi (Anthony Quinn), the leader of the powerful local Howeitat tribe, to turn against the Turks. Lawrence’s plan is almost derailed when one of Ali’s men kills one of Auda’s because of a blood feud. Since Howeitat retaliation would shatter the fragile alliance, Lawrence declares that he will execute the murderer himself. He is stunned to discover that the culprit is Gasim, but he shoots him anyway. The next morning, the intact alliance overruns the Turkish garrison.

Lawrence heads to Cairo to inform Dryden and the new commanding general, General Allenby (Jack Hawkins), of his victory. During the crossing of the Sinai Desert, Daud dies when he stumbles into quicksand. Lawrence is promoted to major and given arms and money to support the Arabs. He is deeply disturbed, confessing that he enjoyed executing Gasim, but Allenby brushes aside his qualms. He asks Allenby whether there is any basis for the Arabs’ suspicions that the British have designs on Arabia. Pressed, the general states they have no such designs.

Act II

Lawrence launches a guerrilla war, blowing up trains and harassing the Turks at every turn. American war correspondent Jackson Bentley (Arthur Kennedy) publicises his exploits, making him world famous. On one raid, Farraj is badly injured. Unwilling to leave him to be tortured, Lawrence is forced to shoot him before fleeing.

When Lawrence scouts the enemy-held city of Daraa with Ali, he is taken, along with several Arab residents, to the Turkish Bey (José Ferrer). Lawrence is stripped, ogled, and prodded. For striking out at the Bey, he is severely flogged, sexually abused (offscreen) and then thrown out into the street.

In Jerusalem, Allenby urges him to support his “big push” on Damascus, but Lawrence is a changed, tormented man, unwilling to return. Finally, he relents.

He recruits an army, mainly killers and cutthroats motivated by money, rather than the Arab cause. They sight a column of retreating Turkish soldiers who have just slaughtered the people of Tafas. One of Lawrence’s men is from the village; he demands, “No prisoners!” When Lawrence hesitates, the man charges the Turks by himself and is killed. Lawrence takes up the dead man’s cry, resulting in a massacre in which Lawrence himself participates with relish.

His men then take Damascus ahead of Allenby’s forces. The Arabs set up a council to administer the city, but they are desert tribesmen, ill-suited for such a task. Unable to maintain the utilities and bickering constantly with each other, they soon abandon most of the city to the British. Lawrence is promoted to colonel and then immediately ordered home, his usefulness at an end to both Faisal and the British diplomats. A dejected Lawrence is driven away in a staff car.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

EYE-BALL MovieZoneA truly epic movie – and almost the equal of  Ben-Hur in 1959.  The void in between has seen movie-goers shortchanged – the cost to produce these three hour epics in remote locations with massive crowd scenes is daunting – yet the plot of this movie demands the expense.

We were richly rewarded for their eforts with another masterpiece.

Peter Toole’s career was defined by his performance in this movie – Anthony Quinn, Omar Sharif and Alex Guinness did not do so bad either – it was also one of the very few big successful movies of its time that had no female lead roles – “A Bridge over the River Kwai” was another.

As this ‘Best Picture’ nominations review journey unfolds – there are now two movies in EYE-BALL MovieZone’s top ten thus far – “Ben-Hur” and “Lawrence of Arabia”.

This movie is a must for any movie collection and its 7 Oscar wins from 10 Nominations makes a mockery of the judgement process for Best picture Oscar winners.   Compared this result with “Gigi” – winner of 9 Academy Awards from 9 Nominations in 1958.  The EYE-BALL MovieZone rating for “Gigi” was 4.5/10 compared with 8.5/10 for “Lawrence of Arabia” – this perhaps gives some indication to my taste in movies – or that the judging at the time was flawed in so many ways.

There is another answer – Studio influence – but it is weigh far too early to go there in this review process.

Highly recommended viewing.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 8.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1962

“The Longest Day”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Longest Day is a 1962 war film based on the 1959 history book The Longest Day by Cornelius Ryan, about “D-Day”, the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during World War II.

Producer Darryl F. Zanuck paid the author of the book, Cornelius Ryan, $175,000 for the screen rights to produce the film.[3] The film was adapted from the book by Romain Gary, James Jones, David Pursall, Jack Seddon, and the author himself. It was directed by Ken Annakin (British and French exteriors), Andrew Marton (American exteriors), Gerd Oswald (parachute drop scene), Bernhard Wicki (German scenes), John Wayne (uncredited) and Darryl F. Zanuck (uncredited).

Many of the military consultants and advisors who helped with the film’s production were actual participants in the action on D-Day, and are portrayed in the film. The producers drew them from both sides; Allied and Axis. Among them are Günther Blumentritt (a former German general), James M. Gavin (an American general), Frederick Morgan (Deputy Chief of Staff at SHAEF), John Howard (who led the airborne assault on the Pegasus Bridge), Lord Lovat (who commanded the 1st Special Service Brigade), Philippe Kieffer (who led his men in the assault on Ouistreham), Pierre Koenig (who commanded the Free French Forces in the invasion), Max Pemsel (a German general), Werner Pluskat (the major who was the first German officer to see the invasion fleet), Josef “Pips” Priller (the hot-headed pilot) and Lucie Rommel (widow of Erwin Rommel).

Unique for World War II films produced at the time, all French and German characters speak in their native language with subtitles in English. A separate version exists, shot simultaneously, in which all the actors speak their lines in English, which is why the trailer has the Germans delivering their lines in English. This version saw limited use during the initial release, and more extensive use during a late 1960s re-release of the film. The English-only version was featured on the “flip side” of an older single disc DVD release.

The film, one of the very few 1960s epics made in black and white, features a large ensemble cast including actors such as Kenneth More, Richard Todd (who took part in the actual invasion), Richard Burton, Robert Mitchum, Sean Connery, Henry Fonda, Red Buttons, Leo Genn, Peter Lawford, Gert Fröbe, John Wayne, Irina Demick, Bourvil, Curd Jürgens, Robert Wagner, Paul Anka and Arletty. Several of these actors played roles that were virtually cameo appearances.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

No Plot Synopsis supplier via Wikipedia.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

A gritty and clumsy war drama with a smorgesboard of credited actors – all English and American alike.  The movie does not grab you – continually has gaps and disjointed scenes.

Watchable – but this type of War drama has dated badly and even with the big name ‘star’ cast – the movie lacks enough to attract a poor rating.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1962

“The Music Man”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Music Man is a 1962 musical film starring Robert Preston as Harold Hill and Shirley Jones as Marian Paroo. The film is based on the 1957 Broadway musical of the same name by Meredith Willson. The film was one of the biggest hits of the year and highly acclaimed critically.

In 2005, The Music Man was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Set in July 1912, a traveling salesman, “Professor” Harold Hill (Robert Preston), arrives in fictional location of River City, Iowa, intrigued by the challenge of swindling the famously stubborn natives of Iowa (“Iowa Stubborn”). Masquerading as a traveling band instructor, Professor Hill plans to con the citizens of River City into paying him to create a boys’ marching band, including instruments, uniforms, and music instruction. Once he has collected the money and the instruments and uniforms have arrived, he will hop the next train out of town leaving them without their money or a band.

With help from his associate Marcellus Washburn (Buddy Hackett), who is now living in River City and is the only one who knows Hill’s real name, Professor Hill incites mass concern among the parents of River City that their young boys are being seduced into a world of sin and vice by the new pool table in town (“Ya Got Trouble”). He convinces them that a boys’ marching band is the only way to keep the boys of the town pure and out of trouble, and begins collecting their money (“76 Trombones”). Hill anticipates that Marian (Shirley Jones), the town’s librarian and piano instructor, will attempt to discredit him, so he sets out to seduce her into silence. Also in opposition to Hill is the town’s Mayor Shinn, who orders the school board to obtain Hill’s credentials. When they attempt to do so, Hill avoids their questions by teaching them to sing as a barbershop quartet via “sustained talking.” They are thereafter easily tricked by Hill into breaking into song whenever they ask for his credentials.

Meanwhile, Hill attempts to win the heart of Marian the librarian, who has an extreme distrust of men. His charms have little effect upon Marian (“Marian the Librarian”) until he wins the admiration of both her mother and her withdrawn and unhappy younger brother Winthrop (Ron Howard) (“Gary, Indiana”). Marian falls in love with Hill, and subsequently hides evidence she has proving he is a fraud (“Till There Was You”). The band’s instruments arrive (“Wells Fargo Wagon”) and Hill tells the boys to learn to play via the “Think System,” in which they simply have to think of a tune over and over and will know how to play it without ever touching their instruments. Meanwhile, Marian is falling more in love with Harold, and in a counterpart with the The Buffalo Bills they sing “Lida Rose/Will I Ever Tell You”. Hill’s con is nearly complete; all he has to do is collect the rest of the instrument and uniform money ,and he can disappear. He is about to leave town when a disgruntled anvil salesman who had been run out of Brighton, Illinois in a backlash to Hill’s having conned the townspeople there comes to River City and exposes Hill and his plans. Chased by an angry mob and pressed to leave town by Marcellus and Marian, Hill realizes that he is in love with Marian and can’t leave River City. He is captured by the mob and brought before a town meeting to be tarred and feathered. Hill is saved by the boys’ band who miraculously have learned to play their own instruments (albeit badly). Hill remains in River City with Marian to conduct the boys’ band full time, which eventually becomes properly trained and equipped with better quality instruments and uniforms.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Never have I found a movie so hard to watch – yet watch I did … How this movie was ever nominated gives me headaches thinking about – worst Best Picture nominated movie I’ve come across to date. The Oscar it did win came in the Best Musical Score – and that was because there was no opposition …

A big fat pass – no recommendation here.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 2.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1962

“Mutiny on the Bounty”

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Mutiny on the Bounty is a 1962 film starring Marlon Brando and Trevor Howard based on the novel Mutiny on the Bounty by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall. The film retells the 1789 real-life mutiny aboard HMAV Bounty led by Fletcher Christian against the ship’s captain, William Bligh. It is the second American film to be made from the novel, the first being Mutiny on the Bounty (1935). It was directed by Lewis Milestone, who replaced Carol Reed early on location shooting. The screenplay was written by Charles Lederer (with uncredited input from Eric Ambler, William L. Driscoll, Borden Chase, John Gay and Ben Hecht).[1]

Mutiny on the Bounty was filmed in the Ultra Panavision 70 widescreen process, the first motion picture so credited. It is notable for its location photography in the South Pacific and its musical score by Bronisław Kaper.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

In 1787, the Bounty sets sail from England for Tahiti under the command of captain William Bligh (Trevor Howard). Her mission is to transport breadfruit to Jamaica, where hopefully it will thrive and provide a cheap source of food for the slaves.

The difficult voyage gets off to a difficult start with the discovery that some cheese is missing. Bligh, the true pilferer, is accused of the theft by seaman John Mills (Richard Harris), and Bligh has Mills brutally flogged for showing contempt to his superior officer, to the disgust of his patrician second-in-command, 1st Lieutenant Fletcher Christian (Marlon Brando). The tone for the months to come is summarized by Bligh’s ominous pronouncement that “cruelty with a purpose is not cruelty, it is efficiency.” Aristocrat Christian is deeply offended by his ambitious captain.

Bligh attempts to reach Tahiti sooner by attempting the shorter westbound route around Cape Horn, a navigational nightmare. The strategy fails and the Bounty backtracks east, costing the mission much time. Singleminded Bligh attempts to make up the lost time by pushing the crew harder and cutting their rations.

When the Bounty reaches her destination, the crew revels in the easygoing life of the tropical paradise — and in the free-love philosophies of the Tahitian women. Christian himself is smitten with Maimiti (Tarita), daughter of the Tahitian king. Bligh’s agitation is further fueled by a dormancy period of the breadfruit: more months of delay until the plants can be transplanted. As departure day nears, three men, including seaman Mills, attempt to desert but are caught by Christian and clapped in irons by Bligh.

On the return voyage, Bligh attempts to bring back twice the number of breadfruit plants to atone for his tardiness, and must reduce the water rations of the crew to water the extra plants. One member of the crew falls from the rigging to his death while attempting to retrieve the drinking ladle. Another assaults Bligh over conditions on the ship and is fatally keelhauled. Mills taunts Christian after each death, trying to egg him on to challenge Bligh. When a crewmember becomes gravely ill from drinking seawater, Christian attempts to give him fresh water in violation of the Captain’s orders. Bligh strikes Christian when he ignores his second order to stop. In response, Christian strikes Bligh. Bligh informs Christian that he will hang for his action when they reach port. With nothing left to lose, Christian takes command of the ship and sets Bligh and the loyalist members of the crew adrift in the longboat with navigational equipment, telling them to make for a local island. Bligh decides instead to cross much of the Pacific in order to reach British authorities sooner and arrives back in England with remarkable speed.

Christian sails back to Tahiti to pick up the girlfriends of the crew, then on to remote and wrongly-charted Pitcairn Island to hide from the wrath of the Royal Navy. Once on Pitcairn, Christian decides that it is their duty to return to England and testify to Bligh’s wrongdoing and asks his men to sail with him. To prevent this possibility they set the ship on fire and Christian is fatally burned while trying to save it.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Trevor Howard as Captain Bligh outshone Brando as Mr Christian in this movie in my opinion.  Richard Harris also makes a good fist of his character.

The movie received no individual Actor category Oscar Nominations and therein lies the truth. The 1935 version starring Clark Gable won Best Picture Oscar – this movie can’t be compared – the technical advances over the ensuring 37 years create a void of opinions on so many levels.

When I first saw this movie as a child – I loved it – it was adventure – naked girl islanders – a slick Brando in his prime – and pommy Trevor Howard as the ‘bad-guy’ … many years later I have come to appreciate the finer points of movie making and this movie could have been so much better. When Bligh departed from his ship – it was like a flame went out for the movie.

Has dated but still an enjoyable watch if you liked Brando –

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1962

“To Kill a Mockingbird”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1962 American drama film adaptation of Harper Lee’s novel of the same name directed by Robert Mulligan. It stars Mary Badham in the role of Scout and Gregory Peck in the role of Atticus Finch.

In 1995, the film was listed in the National Film Registry. It also ranks twenty-fifth on the American Film Institute’s 10th anniversary list of the greatest American movies of all time. In 2003, AFI named Atticus Finch the greatest movie hero of the 20th century.

To Kill a Mockingbird marks the film debuts of Robert Duvall, William Windom, and Alice Ghostley.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The film’s young protagonists, Jean Louise “Scout” Finch (Mary Badham) and her brother Jem (Phillip Alford), live in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama, during the 1930s. The story covers three years, during which Scout and Jem undergo changes in their lives. They begin as innocent children, who spend their days happily playing games with each other and spying on Arthur “Boo” Radley, the town bogeyman (Robert Duvall). Through their father, Atticus (Gregory Peck)’s work as a lawyer, they begin to learn of the racism and evil prevalent in their town, and mature painfully as they are exposed to it.

The kids follow Atticus to watch a rape trial, in which an innocent black man, Tom Robinson, is wrongfully found guilty, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary (among Atticus’ chief arguments, he points out that Tom is crippled in his left arm, and that the supposed rapist would have had to make extensive use of his left hand to have carried out the crime as it was being described by the teenage “victim” and her father. Atticus also brings to light the alarmingly unusual and suspicious fact that the girl had not even been examined by a doctor after the supposed assault to check for signs of rape or to determine if she’d even had her virginity taken), and even after Atticus’ earnest pleas to the jury for them to cast aside their prejudices against Blacks and instead to focus on the evidence of Tom’s obvious innocence.

Atticus arrives home to find out that Robinson has been killed in an attempt to escape from jail. Atticus is subsequently vilified by some of the locals for his having defended a black man, and the whole town is in quite a stir over the matter for a good while, but by October 31 things have apparently settled down, and Scout goes to a Halloween pageant with Jem. On their way home that night, Scout and Jem are attacked by the vengeful Bob Ewell, the drunkard father (and the real assailant) of the girl whom Tom Robinson had been falsely accused of molesting. Mr. Ewell slashes at Scout with a knife, but the chicken-wire framework of her Halloween costume protects her from the blade. During the struggle, Jem is knocked unconscious and his arm is broken, but then Bob Ewell is overpowered and killed by a tall dark figure that suddenly appears on the scene.

Jem is then rescued and carried home by this mysterious man who later turns out to be the previously-mentioned Arthur “Boo” Radley, and afterwards it is revealed that Boo — in caring appreciation for Scout and Jem’s not having taunted and shunned him the way many of the other townspeople had done — had for a long time assumed the role of the children’s guardian angel, often secretly watching over and following a distance behind Scout and Jem when they were out at night, to help them and protect them from harm.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

A gem of a movie that has aged and been better received as time has gone by. Peck is at his best winning Best Actor Oscar for his character Atticus – the Defence Attorney.

Robert Duvall plays his first screen role in this movie at age 31 – he had a number of TV roles prior – but this was his breakout role into Movies.  His next most notable role came in John Wayne’s “True Grit” in 1968 and then in 1972 – he starred in “The Godfather” and his career took off at age 41.

The script is based on a Pulitzer winning Novel and it just goes to show how a simple story told in a simple way can resonate with movie goers.

Highly Recommended viewing.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 6.5/10 …

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