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EYE-BALL MovieZone – Oscar Movies 1961…

October 24, 2011
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Oscar Movies 1961:
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[Oscar Best Picture Winner - highlighted - click Nominee Movie links provided to navigate your way up and down the page - each Movie has additional links to Bit Torrent 'downloads' links, Wikipedia Links for all the information about the nominated movie, and the EYE-BALL MovieZone Reviews and ratings. Movie posters appearing at this site have been copied from Wikipedia and other research related source sites.]

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1961

“West-Side Story”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

West Side Story is a 1961 musical film directed by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins. The film is an adaptation of the 1957 Broadway musical of the same name, which in turn was adapted from William Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet. It stars Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer, Russ Tamblyn, Rita Moreno, George Chakiris and David Winters, and it was photographed by Daniel L. Fapp, A.S.C., in Super Panavision 70.

The film’s opening sequence was shot on the streets of New York City, mainly in the area where the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts campus of Fordham University now stands. Veteran director Robert Wise was chosen as the director and producer because of his familiarity with urban New York dramas, such as Odds Against Tomorrow. Wise had never directed a musical before and when it was suggested that Jerome Robbins, who had directed the stage version, be brought in to handle all the music and dance sequences in the film, Wise agreed. After about one-third of the movie had been shot, the Mirisch Company, which had become increasingly concerned that the production was over-budget, fired Robbins, who, according to Saul Chaplin in his autobiography, nearly suffered a nervous breakdown during the time he worked on the film. The remaining dance numbers were handled by Robbins’ assistants. However, because of his great creative contribution to the film, Wise agreed Robbins be given co-directing credit, even though Wise directed the majority of the film himself.

The film was released on October 18, 1961, through United Artists. It received praise from critics and the public, and became the second highest grossing film of the year in the United States. The film won ten Academy Awards in its eleven nominated categories, including Best Picture, as well as a special award for Robbins. West Side Story holds the distinction of having won more Academy Awards than any other musical film (unless one counts the Honorary Award given to Maurice Chevalier in 1959, the year that Gigi won its nine Oscars. The soundtrack album sold more copies than any soundtrack album before it, and more than the original cast album did

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Act I

The film opens in the streets of Manhattan in the late summer of 1957. There is a mounting tension set to music (“Prologue”) between a white American gang, the Jets, led by Riff Lorton (Russ Tamblyn), and a rival gang of Puerto Rican immigrants, the Sharks, led by Bernardo Nunez (George Chakiris). The Jets harass the Sharks and vice versa, culminating in a free-for-all on the playground. They dance and eventually the Sharks grab one of the Jets, the youngest, named Baby John (Eliot Feld), and begin to “bloody” him. Soon, Lieutenant Schrank (Simon Oakland) and Officer Krupke (William Bramley[1]) arrive and break up the melee. Schrank orders the Sharks off the playground and the Jets “to make nice with them Puerto Ricans” or there’ll be a price to pay. Once Schrank and Krupke are gone, the Jets discuss challenging the Sharks to an all out rumble that will decide who gets control of the streets. They decide to deliver the challenge to the Sharks at a dance later that night, because it is neutral territory.

Riff decides that his best friend Tony Wycek (Richard Beymer), a co-founder of the Jets who has left the gang to work at a local candy/drug store, would be the best member to present the challenge to the Sharks because he has always come through for the Jets (“Jet Song”). Riff visits Tony at the store and asks him to come to the dance, but Tony is not interested. He tells Riff that he senses something very important is about to happen to him. After a little cajoling from Riff, Tony changes his mind and agrees to meet him and the Jets at the dance, in case it is there that he will discover that “something” (“Something’s Coming”).

Bernardo arrives to take his sister Maria (Natalie Wood) and his girlfriend Anita (Rita Moreno) to the dance. At the dance, which is held at the gym, the Jets, Sharks, and girls are greatly enjoying themselves (“Dance at the Gym”). The host of the dance, social worker Glad Hand (John Astin), tries to get the members of the rival gangs to dance together. Even so, the rival gang members and their girlfriends remain apart. During a mambo, Tony and Maria see each other, become infatuated, going into a trance-like state, and begin to dance, oblivious to the rivalry between their ethnic groups. They eventually kiss, but Bernardo angrily interrupts them. He orders Maria home and tells Tony to stay away from his sister. It’s at this point that Riff proposes a “war council” with Bernardo, who agrees to meet at Doc’s drug store after the dance. Tony leaves in a happy daze, singing of his newfound love (“Maria”).

Maria is sent home, and Anita argues with Bernardo that they are in America, not Puerto Rico. At the Sharks’ apartment building, Anita and other girls from Puerto Rico engage in a spirited argument with Bernardo in defense of Maria’s right to dance with whomever she pleases. They debate the advantages and disadvantages of their country (“America”). Eventually the women and the men disperse as Bernardo and his gang go to the war council.

Tony discreetly visits Maria outside the fire escape at her home and they confirm their love (“Tonight”). They arrange to meet the next day at the bridal shop where Maria works. Meanwhile, the Jets gather outside of Doc’s store to wait for the Sharks. They are visited by Officer Krupke, who warns them not to cause trouble on his beat. After he leaves, they lampoon him and the various theories of how to deal with juvenile delinquency (“Gee, Officer Krupke”). Doc (Ned Glass) is about to close the store, but the Jets convince him to stay open. The Sharks finally arrive and the war council begins. In the middle of this, Tony arrives and calls them chickens for having to fight with weapons. He demands that they have a fair one-on-one fist fight instead of an all-out rumble. The gang leaders agree, with Bernardo representing the Sharks and Ice (Tucker Smith) representing the Jets (much to Bernardo’s disappointment, as he was hoping to face Tony). They are soon alerted of Lieutenant Schrank’s arrival, so the gangs quickly intermix together and feign happiness and fun. Schrank pretends that it is a good thing that they are getting along and he might even get a promotion, but he knows what they are up to. Schrank orders the Puerto Ricans out (while they whistle “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee”), then asks the Jets where the rumble is taking place, angering several members (especially Action) while doing so. Soon, the Jets disperse and Schrank leaves as well, leaving Tony and Doc alone in the store to clean up. Tony, who is in a good mood, surprises Doc and tells him about his love for Maria. The day comes to an end as a distressed Doc closes the store and Tony leaves.
[edit] Act II

The next day at Madam Lucia’s bridal shop, Maria sings to her co-workers about how happy and excited she is (“I Feel Pretty”). After everyone except Maria and Anita leaves, Anita tells Maria about the impending rumble accidentally. Anita tells Maria to go home, but Maria insists that she wants to close the store by herself because she has work to do. Suddenly, Tony arrives to see Maria, leaving Anita in shock. Tony tells Anita of his and Maria’s love, and Anita mocks Maria. Although Anita is initially shocked to see that Maria and Tony are having a romance, she shows some tolerance but worries about the consequences if Bernardo were to find out. Anita, who is also Maria’s roommate, leaves to prepare for a planned date with Bernardo after the rumble. Maria pleads with Tony to prevent the rumble altogether, even if it is only a fist fight, and Tony promises to do so. Then Tony and Maria, using clothes in the bridal shop, fantasize about their wedding (“One Hand, One Heart”). They use the headless mannequins as their parents, best man (Riff) and Maid of Honor (Anita). They exchange wedding vows and kiss.

A musical montage (“Quintet”) intertwines the feelings of the Jets and Sharks in anticipation of the rumble, Tony and Maria’s anticipation of meeting each other, and Anita preparing for her date with Bernardo. The Jets and Sharks arrive at their agreed location for the rumble, a fenced dead-end under a stretch of New York highway. As the “fair fight” begins between Bernardo and Ice, Tony arrives and tries to stop it, but is met with ridicule and mockery from Bernardo and the Sharks. Unable to stand by and watch his best friend be humiliated, Riff angrily lashes out and punches Bernardo (“The Rumble”). Drawing their knives, Riff and Bernardo fight each other. Once Riff gets the upper hand, Tony stops him. However, Riff breaks away and runs back into the fight, only to be stabbed by Bernardo. Riff collapses while handing the knife to Tony and Bernardo looks shocked at what he has done. Enraged, Tony kills Bernardo with Riff’s knife, resulting in a full-fledged melee. Suddenly, police sirens blare out and the gang members flee, leaving behind the bodies of Riff and Bernardo.

Blissfully unaware of what has happened, Maria is waiting for Tony on the roof of her apartment building. One of the Sharks, Chino (Jose DeVega), whom Maria has been promised to, arrives and angrily tells her that Tony killed her brother. Tony arrives, and initially Maria lashes out at him in anger, but Tony explains what happened and asks for her forgiveness before turning himself in to the police. Maria decides that she still loves Tony and begs him to stay with her. They reaffirm their love (“Somewhere”), kiss, and make love for the first time (offscreen).

Meanwhile, the Jets (with Ice now in command and joined by the Jet girls) have reassembled outside a garage. Action demands revenge for Riff’s death, but Baby John opposes it. Action yells at Baby John for being scared, then tensions flare amongst several Jets. Ice pulls them all into the garage and tells them they will have their revenge on the Sharks, but must do it carefully (“Cool”). Anybodys (Susan Oakes), a tomboy who is desperate to join the Jets, arrives after infiltrating the Sharks’ turf and warns them that Chino is now after Tony with a gun. Ice sends the Jets to various locations to find Tony and warn him. Anybodys’ persistence finally pays off as Ice asks her to search in and out of the shadows and commends her for her deed.

In Maria’s bedroom, she and Tony have just finished making love. The couple hear Anita arriving home, and Maria and Tony make quick, whispered arrangements to meet at Doc’s drug store and run away together to marry. Anita hears through the door and knows that something is going on. Tony escapes through the bedroom window and flees, but Anita sees him running away. Anita chides Maria for the relationship (“A Boy Like That”). Anita says that a man who kills is bad, but she soon softens as Maria sings back. Maria’s heartfelt love (“I Have a Love”) wins over Anita, and despite her grief over Bernardo’s death, Anita agrees to cooperate with a plan to help Maria and Tony run away and marry, because she is her friend. Anita quickly tells Maria that Chino is searching for Tony with a gun.

Lieutenant Schrank arrives and questions Maria about the events leading up to the rumble, but Maria is protective of Tony and lies to cover for him. To deceive the policeman, Maria sends Anita to Doc’s drugstore on the pretense that she is fetching medicine for her headache. She asks Anita to say she has been detained, explaining she would have gone herself otherwise. Anita’s real purpose is to tell Tony (who is found by Anybodys outside Maria’s apartment and takes refuge in the cellar of Doc’s drugstore) that Maria is detained from meeting him. But when Anita enters the drugstore and asks for Tony, the Jets mock, harass, and mock rape her until Doc stops them. Infuriated by the attack, Anita gives the Jets a different message for Tony: Maria is dead, shot by Chino for loving Tony. Doc reproaches the Jets, then delivers the message to Tony. In shock and despair, Tony runs to find Chino, shouting “Come and get me, too!”, and not knowing that Chino is actually secretly waiting for him.

Now on the playground next to Doc’s store, Tony suddenly sees Maria and they begin to run toward each other with joy. Suddenly, Chino appears and shoots Tony. As the Jets and Sharks arrive, Maria and a fatally wounded Tony reaffirm their love (“Somewhere”), but Tony dies in her arms. Maria takes the gun from Chino and blames the rival gang members for the deaths of Tony, Bernardo, and Riff with their hate, threatening to kill as many of them as she can, while still leaving one bullet for herself. However, she can’t do it and drops the gun before sinking to the ground, crying. Three of the Jets start lifting his body and two Sharks join them to help carry him off. Maria and several Jets and Sharks walk behind them in a funeral procession and Chino is arrested for killing Tony.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

It is hard to be anything but critical of the movie – it did win 10 Oscars from 11 Nominations – originally a stage production the big screen version lost a lot of its magic.  The choreography has surely dated as has the music.

This was Natalie Wood’s breakout role and she does make the movie more enjoyable.  The love interest plot is as old as Romeo and Juliet and in a weak year for movies – the Oscar decisions were not hard.

After the Ben-Hur epic in 1959 – 1960′s “The Apartment”, and 1961′s “West Side Story”, were poor cousins and movie goers were short-changed.  As mentioned – not a movie that has aged well – the ‘gangs’ relevance is there but not the violence we see today in real life.

Not a movie I would chase to see – but having watched it twice in the last 10 months – that is enough for me.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 5.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1961

“Fanny”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Fanny is a 1961 American drama film directed by Joshua Logan. The screenplay by Julius J. Epstein is based on the book for the 1954 stage musical of the same title by Logan and S.N. Behrman, which in turn had been adapted from Marcel Pagnol’s trilogy: Marius (1929) and Fanny (1932), plays which he adapted to film a year or two later; and César, the film he wrote and directed for the screen in 1936 (and later adapted for the stage).

The film deleted all the songs from the 1954 stage musical, but the music by Harold Rome served as the underscore for the soundtrack, and the title tune is used as the Main Title theme. Although it had been composed for another medium, it was nominated for both the Academy Award and the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

César is a barkeeper in Marseille in the early 1920s. His 19-year-old son Marius works for him at his bar, but wants nothing more than to go to sea and leave his boring existence behind. The only thing holding him back is Fanny, an 18-year-old girl with whom he grew up. Fanny works selling fish with her mother down at the waterfront. Fanny has been in love with Marius her whole life, and flirts with him, but Marius always rejects her.

Fanny invites Marius to a Sunday night dance, but he rejects her once more. Unbeknownst to Fanny, Marius is planning to leave the next day, having secretly signed on as a sailor on a lengthy scientific expedition traveling around the world after being encouraged to do so by his friend known as the Admiral. Fanny is offended and leaves.

Meanwhile, elderly but wealthy merchant Panisse asks to meet with Fanny’s mother Honorine, who believes he wants to propose to her. To her surprise, he wants to marry Fanny, even though he knows she loves someone else. Although disappointed, Honorine does not object, seeing as Panisse is worth 600,000 francs.

Fanny tells Marius she has rejected Panisse’s proposal because she loves him and is willing to wait until he returns. Marius tells her he will be away for five years and to forget about him. They declare their love for each other and go to Fanny’s house, which is empty while her mother is away.

The following morning, Honorine discovers Fanny and Marius in bed together. She and César begin to plan their children’s wedding, but Fanny urges Marius to leave, even lying to him, telling him that she would rather marry a rich man like Panisse than she would him. But, in truth, she is fearful he eventually will grow to hate her for depriving him of this great opportunity.

Around two months after Marius goes off to sea, Fanny discovers she is pregnant with Marius’s child and tells Panisse the news. He is happy to marry her anyway, overjoyed with the possibility of a male heir to carry on his name. They marry and Fanny gives birth to a boy to whom César is godfather. César, knowing the baby’s true father, collaborates with Panisse to give the baby the name Césario Marius Panisse.

On Césario’s first birthday, Panisse leaves on the train to Paris on business, and while he is gone, Marius returns on a short leave. He visits Fanny, and upon learning her child is his, apologizes to Fanny, as he knows now she said those things only to make him go. Marius tells her that he wants her back, but then César comes in before anything can happen. Panisse then arrives home early and says that he will not try to stop Fanny from leaving with Marius but he will not part with the child, knowing that Fanny won’t leave without the boy. Fanny tells Marius she loves him but will not take Césario from Panisse, as it was Panisse who had been there for Fanny and Césario all along. César advises his son the father is “the one who loves,” and Panisse loves this child and has been a wonderful father to him. Marius then departs with neither Fanny nor his child.

Ten years later, Césario is looking forward to his birthday party. After being taken to the waterfront with Fanny’s mother, Césario wanders off and meets the Admiral. The Admiral takes the boy sailing without telling anyone and reunites him with Marius, though Césario has no idea who Marius is. Marius, who is now working in a garage, is overjoyed to see his son, but when Panisse is told the boy is missing, he is stricken and taken to his room. Fanny finds Césario with his father and is shocked. She announces that Panisse is dying and Marius drives them home to the dying Panisse.

When they arrive at the house, Panisse calls for Césario to sit with him, leaving Fanny and Marius together. Fanny explains to Marius she never told him about the baby because she fully expected him to take her with him and, when he didn’t, she felt betrayed and was angry. Fanny then goes to Panisse and as he lies dying, Panisse dictates a letter asking Marius to marry his wife once he is dead, and be a father to Césario; his only request being that the boy keep his last name.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

The French do it ‘chic’ as they say.  The aged Boyer adds class as does the French actress Caron the female interest.  Has similarities to ‘Gigi’ – in so far as how the French like to present their movies.  There is a series of scenes about two thirds through the movie when the prodigal son returns from his sea-born adventure.

He re-aquaints himself with his love and discovers he is a father – the scene unfolds in tragic love story terms – and this made the movie …

Enjoyable to watch but not the type of movie you would want to keep going back to watch – has dated somewhat.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1961

“Guns of Navarone”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Guns of Navarone is a 1961 British-American war film based on the 1957 novel of the same name about the Dodecanese Campaign of World War II by Scottish thriller writer Alistair MacLean. It stars Gregory Peck, David Niven and Anthony Quinn, along with Anthony Quayle and Stanley Baker. The book and the film share the same basic plot: the efforts of an Allied commando team to destroy a seemingly impregnable German fortress that threatens Allied naval ships in the Aegean Sea, and prevents 2,000 isolated British troops from being rescued.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

In 1943, the Axis powers decide on a show of strength to bully neutral Turkey into joining the war on their side. Their target is 2000 British soldiers who are marooned on the island of Keros in the Aegean. Rescue by the Royal Navy is impossible because of massive radar-directed guns on the nearby island of Navarone. Time is short, because the Germans are expected to launch an assault on the British forces.

Efforts to destroy the guns by bombing have proved fruitless. So that six destroyers can pick up the stranded men, Commodore Jensen of Allied intelligence activates a team of saboteurs to sail to Navarone and destroy the guns. Led by Major Roy Franklin (Anthony Quayle), they are Captain Keith Mallory (Gregory Peck); Andrea Stavrou (Anthony Quinn), a former Colonel in the defeated Greek army; Corporal Miller (David Niven), an explosives expert; Greek-American Spyros Pappadimos (James Darren); and “Butcher” Brown (Stanley Baker), an engineer and expert knife fighter.

Disguised as Greek fishermen on a decrepit boat, they sail across the Aegean Sea. They are intercepted by a German boat and boarded. They attack and kill all the Germans and sink the patrol boat. During the remainder of the voyage, Mallory confides to Franklin that Andrea has sworn to kill him after the war, because he was inadvertently responsible for the deaths of Andrea’s wife and children.

In a violent storm, the ship is wrecked and they lose part of their equipment, but manage to land on the island. Led by Mallory, who was recruited for his climbing skills, they scale the ‘unclimbable’ cliff. But Franklin is badly injured; the injury later becoming infected with gangrene. They find that the cliff is in fact guarded after all. Miller, a friend of Franklin, suggests that they leave Franklin to be “well cared for” by the enemy. Mallory, who now assumes command of the mission, feels that Franklin would be forced to reveal their plans, so he orders two men to carry the injured man on a stretcher.

Franklin tries to commit suicide, but Mallory lies to him, saying that their mission has been “scrubbed” and that a major naval attack will be mounted on Navarone. They rendezvous with local resistance workers, Spyros’s sister Maria (Irene Papas) and her friend Anna (Gia Scala), who is supposedly mute after German torture.

The mission is continually dogged by Germans, and they are captured by Lieutenant Muesel (Walter Gotell) in the town of Mandrakos, when they try to find a doctor for Franklin. Muesel and Hauptmann Sessler (George Mikell) of the SS fail to persuade the commandos to tell them where Miller’s explosives are. Andrea pretends to betray the others and surprises the Germans, allowing the group to overpower their captors. They escape in German uniform, but leave Franklin behind so that he can receive medical attention.

In due course, Franklin is injected with scopolamine and gives up the false “information”, as Mallory had hoped. German units are deployed away from the guns and in the direction of the supposed invasion point.

Miller discovers that most of his explosives have been sabotaged and deduces that Anna is the saboteur. It transpires that she is not mute after all and was not tortured by the Nazis; but she agreed to become an informer in exchange for her release. She pleads that she was coerced by the Germans into treachery, but Mallory decides she must be silenced. It is Maria who shoots her dead.

The team splits up: Mallory and Miller go for the guns, while Andrea and Pappadimos create a distraction in the city; Maria and Brown are assigned to steal a boat for their escape.

Mallory and Miller make their way into the heavily fortified gun emplacements. Locking the main entrance behind them — which sets off an alarm — they set obvious explosives on the guns and hide more below an elevator leading to the guns. The Germans cut through the thick emplacement doors, as Mallory and Miller make their escape by diving into the sea, reaching the stolen boat. But Pappadimos and Brown have been killed and Andrea is wounded. Mallory saves him, pulling him into the boat; thus voiding the ‘blood feud’ between them.

The Allied destroyers appear on schedule. The Germans remove the explosives planted on the guns and begin to fire on the passing Allied flotilla. The first salvo falls short. The second brackets the lead ship. However, just as the guns are prepared to fire again, the elevator descends low enough to trigger the hidden explosives. The guns and fortifications are destroyed in a spectacular explosion. Franklin is able to hear it from his hospital bed.

Andrea, who has fallen in love with Maria, decides to return to Navarone with her. Mallory and Miller observe the destruction from the destroyer.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Peck is brilliant in his role as the leader of a combined group of commando’s on a raid to destroy Nazi fortress harassing Allied shipping. The interplay between Quinn and Peck characters is the highlight of the movie – Niven as the so called ‘expert’ was never made for ‘action’ type movies – his style detracts from the plot and it is not one of his better roles … the scene where he threatens everybody is pure delight in acting terms.

Recommended viewing … if not only to see Gregory Peck in one of his finest roles.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1961

“The Hustler”

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Hustler is a 1961 American drama film directed by Robert Rossen from the 1959 novel of the same name he and Sidney Carroll adapted for the screen. It tells the story of small-time pool hustler “Fast Eddie” Felson and his desire to prove himself the best player in the country by beating legendary pool player “Minnesota Fats.” After initially losing to Fats and getting involved with unscrupulous manager Bert Gordon, Eddie returns to beat Fats, but only after paying a terrible personal price.

The film was shot on location in New York City. It stars Paul Newman as Eddie Felson, Jackie Gleason as Minnesota Fats, Piper Laurie as Sarah, and George C. Scott as Bert.

The Hustler was a major critical and popular success, gaining a reputation as a modern classic. Its exploration of winning, losing, and character garnered a number of major awards; it is also credited with helping to spark a resurgence in the popularity of pool. A real pool hustler was inspired to adopt the name of Gleason’s character, Minnesota Fats, and to use the association with the film in his search for celebrity.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Small-time pool hustler “Fast Eddie” Felson travels cross-country with his partner Charlie to challenge the legendary player “Minnesota Fats”. Arriving at Ames, Fats’s home pool hall, Eddie declares he will win $10,000 that night. Fats arrives and he and Eddie agree to play for $200 a game. After initially falling behind, Eddie surges back to being $1,000 ahead and suggests raising the bet to $1,000 a game; Fats agrees. He sends out a runner, Preacher, to Johnny’s Bar, ostensibly for a bottle of whiskey, but really to get professional gambler Bert Gordon to the hall. Eddie gets ahead $11,000 and Charlie tries to convince him to quit, but Eddie insists the game will end only when Fats says it is over. Fats agrees to continue after Bert labels Eddie a “loser.” After 25 hours and an entire bottle of bourbon, Eddie is ahead over $18,000, but loses it all along with all but $200 of his original stake. At their hotel later, Eddie leaves half of the remaining stake with a sleeping Charlie and leaves.

Eddie stashes his belongings at the local bus terminal, where he meets Sarah Packard, an alcoholic “college girl” who walks with a limp. He meets her again at a bar. They go back to her place but she refuses to let him in, saying he is “too hungry.” Eddie moves into a rooming house and starts hustling for small stakes. He finds Sarah again and this time she takes him in, but with reservations. Charlie finds Eddie at Sarah’s and tries to persuade him to go back out on the road. Eddie refuses and Charlie figures out he plans to challenge Fats again. Eddie realizes that Charlie held out his percentage and becomes enraged, believing that with that money he could have rebounded to beat Fats. Eddie dismisses Charlie as a scared old man and tells him to “go lie down and die” by himself.

At Johnny’s Bar, Eddie finds a poker game where Bert is sitting and Eddie loses $20. After the game, Bert tells Eddie that he has talent as a pool player but no character. He figures that Eddie will need at least $3,000 to challenge Fats again. Bert calls him a “born loser” but nevertheless offers to stake him in return for 75% of his winnings but Eddie refuses.

Eddie hustles a local pool shark, who breaks Eddie’s thumbs. Sarah cares for him and tells him she loves him, but he cannot say the words in return. When his thumbs heal, Eddie agrees to Bert’s terms, deciding that a “twenty-five percent slice of something big is better than a hundred percent slice of nothing.”

Bert, Eddie and Sarah travel to Louisville for the Kentucky Derby, where Bert arranges a match for Eddie against a wealthy local socialite named Findley. The game turns out to be billiards, not pool. Eddie loses badly and Bert refuses to keep staking him. Sarah pleads with Eddie to leave with her, saying that the world he is living in and its inhabitants are “perverted, twisted and crippled”; he refuses. Seeing Eddie’s anger, Bert agrees to let the match continue at $1,000 a game. Eddie comes back to win $12,000. He collects his $3,000 share and decides to walk back to the hotel. Bert arrives first and subjects Sarah to a humiliating sexual encounter. After, she scrawls “PERVERTED”, “TWISTED”, and “CRIPPLED” in lipstick on the bathroom mirror. Eddie arrives back at the hotel to learn that she has killed herself.

Eddie returns to challenge Fats again, putting up his entire $3,000 stake on a single game. After declaring he now has character, Eddie wins game after game, beating Fats so badly that Fats is forced to quit. Bert demands a share of Eddie’s winnings and threatens Eddie over the issue, but Eddie, invoking the memory of Sarah, shames Bert into giving up his claim. Eddie asserts Bert is ultimately the loser for having no love other than money. Bert warns Eddie never to walk into a big-time pool hall again.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

One of Newman’s’ breakout rolls – the movie is all about the dialog and the setting – the game of 8 ball is just the backdrop – people and how pressures and influences impact on outcomes – and how money adds and becomes the common thread – those who have it – those who want it – and how to go about enticing those who want it to risk all to get it.

Great viewing – B&W and has dated – the follow-up with Tom Cruise is also a top notch movie …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 5.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1961

“Judgement at Nuremberg”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Judgment at Nuremberg is a 1961 drama film dealing with The Holocaust and the post-World War II Nuremberg Trials. It was written by Abby Mann, directed by Stanley Kramer, and starred Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Maximilian Schell, Werner Klemperer, Marlene Dietrich, Judy Garland, William Shatner and Montgomery Clift. An earlier adaptation had been broadcast as a television episode of Playhouse 90.[1] Schell and Klemperer played the same roles in this version as well. It was among the first films to be made about the Holocaust.

The film depicts the trial of certain judges who served during the Nazi regime in Germany. The film was inspired by the Judges’ Trial before the Nuremberg Military Tribunal in 1947, where four of the defendants were sentenced to life in prison. A key thread in the film’s plot involves a “race defilement” trial known as the “Feldenstein case”. In this fictionalized case, based on the real life Katzenberger Trial, an elderly Jewish man was tried for an improper relationship with an “Aryan” woman, and put to death in 1942.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Judgment at Nuremberg centers on a military tribunal in which four judges are accused of crimes against humanity for their actions during the Nazi regime. Judge Dan Haywood (Spencer Tracy), the chief justice in the case, attempts to understand how defendant Ernst Janning (Burt Lancaster) could have passed sentences resulting in genocide, and by extension how the German people could have turned blind eyes and deaf ears to the Holocaust. Doing so, he befriends the widow (Marlene Dietrich) of a German general executed by the Allies. He talks with a number of Germans with different perspectives on the war. Other characters the Judge meets are U.S. Army Captain Byers (William Shatner), who is assigned to the American party hearing the cases, and Irene Wallner (Judy Garland), who is afraid to bring testimony that may turn the case against the judges in favor of the prosecution.

The film examines the questions of individual complicity in crimes committed by the state. For example, defense attorney Hans Rolfe (Maximilian Schell) raises such issues as the support of U.S. Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. for eugenics practices, the Hitler-Vatican Reichskonkordat in 1933, the Nazi-Soviet Pact in 1939 that allowed Hitler to start World War II and Winston Churchill’s praising of Adolf Hitler. In the end, Janning makes a statement condemning himself and his fellow defendants for “going along” with the Third Reich and all four are found guilty and sentenced to life in prison.

The film is notable for showing actual historical footage filmed by American soldiers after the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps. Shown in court by prosecuting attorney Colonel Tad Lawson (Richard Widmark), the footage of huge piles of naked corpses laid out in rows and bulldozed into large pits was exceptionally gruesome for a mainstream film of its day.

The film ends with Haywood’s having to choose between patriotism and justice. He rejects the call to let the Nazi judges off lightly to gain Germany’s support in the Cold War against the Soviet Union

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Heavy viewing for survivors of the ‘Holocaust’ – Tracy is brilliant in his role as the Head Jurist – his relationship with Dietrich is believable and creates a mellowing of the harsh trial evidence …

A movie every one should see at least once to understand what the human instinct is capable of – from the aggressor – to the silent – to the vanquished – and to the military for all their roles in allowing something like this to be in our living history …

Recommended viewing.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 6.0/10 …

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