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EYE-BALL MovieZone – Oscar Movies 1960…

October 17, 2011
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EYE-BALL MovieZone –
Oscar Movies 1960:
EYE-BALL MovieZone1960 Nominees:

[Oscar Best Picture Winner – highlighted – click Nominee Movie links provided to navigate your way up and down the page – each Movie has additional links to Bit Torrent ‘downloads’ links, Wikipedia Links for all the information about the nominated movie, and the EYE-BALL MovieZone Reviews and ratings. Movie posters appearing at this site have been copied from Wikipedia and other research related source sites.]

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1960

“The Apartment”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Apartment is a 1960 American comedy-drama film produced and directed by Billy Wilder, and starring Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, and Fred MacMurray. It was Wilder’s follow-up to the enormously popular Some Like It Hot and, like its predecessor, was a commercial and critical hit, grossing $25 million at the box office. The film was nominated for 10 Academy Awards, and won five, including Best Picture.

It was later adapted as a Broadway musical, Promises, Promises, with a book by Neil Simon, music by Burt Bacharach and lyrics by Hal David.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

C. C. Baxter (Jack Lemmon) is a lonely office drone for an insurance company in New York City. In order to climb the corporate ladder, Baxter allows four company managers to use his Upper West Side apartment for their various extramarital liaisons. Unhappy with the situation, but unwilling to challenge the managers, Baxter juggles their conflicting demands, while hoping to catch the eye of fetching elevator operator Fran Kubelik (Shirley MacLaine). Meanwhile Baxter’s neighbors assume he is a “good time Charlie” who brings home a different drunken woman every night. Baxter accepts their criticism rather than reveal the truth.

The four managers write glowing reports about Baxter — so glowing that personnel director Mr. Sheldrake (Fred MacMurray) suspects something illicit behind the praise, and summons Baxter to his office in order to confront him. Sheldrake lets Baxter’s promotion go unchallenged on the condition that he be allowed to use the apartment as well, starting that night. Sheldrake gives Baxter two tickets to the Broadway musical The Music Man to ensure his absence. Delighted about his promotion, Baxter asks Miss Kubelik to meet him at the theatre. She agrees; however (unbeknownst to Baxter), she is in reality Sheldrake’s mistress. Though she intends to break off the affair that night, she is instead charmed by Sheldrake to Baxter’s apartment. Baxter is disappointed at being stood up, but is willing to forgive Miss Kubelik.  Jack Lemmon as C.C. Baxter and Shirley MacLaine as Fran Kubelik

At a Christmas Eve office party, Baxter inadvertently discovers the relationship between Sheldrake and Miss Kubelik, though he conceals this realization. For her part, Miss Kubelik learns from Sheldrake’s secretary (Edie Adams) that she is merely the latest female employee to be his mistress, the secretary herself having filled that role several years earlier. At the apartment, Miss Kubelik confronts Sheldrake with this information, and while he maintains that he genuinely loves her, he leaves to return to his family. Meanwhile, a depressed Baxter picks up a woman in a local bar and, upon returning to the apartment, is shocked to find Miss Kubelik in his bed, fully clothed and overdosed on Baxter’s sleeping pills.

Baxter sends his bar pickup home and enlists the help of his neighbour, Dr. Dreyfus, in reviving Miss Kubelik without notifying the authorities. The doctor makes various assumptions about Miss Kubelik and Baxter, which Baxter concedes without revealing Sheldrake’s involvement. Baxter later telephones Sheldrake at his home on Christmas morning and informs him of the situation; while Sheldrake professes gratitude for Baxter’s quiet handling of the matter, he avoids any further involvement. Miss Kubelik recuperates in Baxter’s apartment under his care for two days, during which he tries to entertain and distract her from any further suicidal thoughts, talking her into playing numerous hands of gin rummy, though she is largely uninterested.

Baxter and Miss Kubelik’s absence from work is noted and commented on, with Baxter’s former “customers” assuming that Baxter and Miss Kubelik were having an affair. Miss Kubelik’s taxi-driver brother-in-law comes looking for her and two of the customers cheerfully direct him to Baxter’s apartment, partly out of spite, since he has been denying them access since his arrangement with Sheldrake. The brother-in-law also assumes the worst of Baxter and punches him twice after confronting the pair in Baxter’s apartment.

Sheldrake, angered at his secretary for sharing the truth with Miss Kubelik, fires her. She retaliates by telling his wife about his infidelities, leading to the breakup of the marriage. Sheldrake moves into a room at his athletic club and continues to string Miss Kubelik along while he enjoys his newfound bachelorhood. Baxter finally takes a stand to become a man of integrity when Sheldrake demands the apartment for another liaison with Miss Kubelik on New Year’s Eve, which results in Baxter quitting the firm. When Miss Kubelik hears of this from Sheldrake, she realizes that Baxter is the man who truly loves her and runs to his apartment. Baxter, in the midst of packing to move out, is bewildered by her appearance and her insistence on resuming their earlier game of gin rummy. When he declares his love for her, her reply is the now-famous final line of the film: “Shut up and deal”

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Loved MacLaine and Lemmon together – this movie brings out the best of their talents – quirky misfits and awkward … MacLaine is a star – her raw comedy ability was and remains her greatest talent with serious drama just as easy …

Light hearted drama and had dated as a plot concept … but for seer Lemmon magic and MacLaine beauty … well worth the effort to watch – but no way can I accept that this movie was deserving ‘Best Picture’ winner up against ‘Elmer Gantry’.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 5.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1960

“The Alamo”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Alamo is a 1960 American historical epic released by United Artists. The film was directed by John Wayne, who also starred as Davy Crockett. The cast also includes Richard Widmark as Jim Bowie and Laurence Harvey as William B. Travis, with Frankie Avalon, Chill Wills, Patrick Wayne, Linda Cristal, Joseph Calleia, Ruben Padilla, Richard Boone, Ken Curtis, Hank Worden, and Denver Pyle. It was photographed in 70 mm Todd-AO by William H. Clothier. The subject is the 1836 Battle of the Alamo.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The film depicts the Battle of the Alamo and the events leading up to it. Sam Houston leads the forces fighting for Texas independence and needs time to build an army. The opposing Mexican forces, led by General Santa Anna, are numerically stronger and also better armed and trained. Nevertheless, the Texans have spirit and morale remains generally high.

Lieutenant Colonel William Travis is tasked with defending the Alamo, a former mission just outside San Antonio. Jim Bowie arrives with reinforcements, and the defenders dig in. Meanwhile, Davy Crockett arrives in San Antonio with a company of men from Tennessee. Crockett meets with Travis, and after Travis informs him of the direness of the situation, Crockett and his men join forces with the Alamo garrison.

Santa Anna’s armies arrive and surround the fort. The siege begins. Santa Anna demands surrender; Travis replies with a cannon shot.

In a nighttime raid, the Texans sabotage the Mexicans’ biggest cannon. The Texans maintain high hopes as they are told a strong force led by Colonel James Fannin is on its way to break the siege. Crockett, however, sensing an imminent attack, sends one of his younger men, Smitty, to ask Houston for help. Crockett knows this will perhaps save Smitty’s life.

The Mexicans attack in a frontal assault on the Alamo. The defenders hold out and kill hundreds of charging Mexican soldiers, further boosting morale, although the Texans’ own losses are not insignficant. Morale drops when Travis tells his men that the Fannin’s reinforcements have been ambushed and slaughtered by the Mexicans.

Travis chooses to stay with his command and defend the Alamo, but he gives the other defenders the option of leaving. Crockett, Bowie and their men prepare to leave, but a speech of encouragement by Travis convinces them to stay and fight to the end.

On the thirteenth day of the siege, Santa Anna’s artillery bombards the Alamo and kills or wounds several Texans. Bowie is seriously wounded in the leg. The entire Mexican army then sweeps forward, attacking on all sides. The defenders kill dozens of charging Mexicans, but the attack is overwhelming. The Mexicans blast a hole in the Alamo wall and soldiers swarm through. Travis tries to rally the men but is shot and killed. Crockett leads the Texans in the final defense of the fort. The Mexicans take heavy losses, but swarm through and overwhelm the Texans. The Texans retreat to their final defensive positions. Crockett is killed in the chaos when he is run through by a lance and then blown up as he ignites the powder magazine. Bowie, in bed with his wound, kills several Mexicans but is bayoneted and dies. As the last Texan is killed, the Mexican soldiers discover the hiding place of the wife and child of Texan defender Captain Dickinson. The battle is over and the Mexicans have won.

Santa Anna observes the carnage and provides safe passage for Mrs. Dickinson and her child. Smitty returns too late, watching from a distance. He takes off his hat in respect and then escorts Mrs. Dickinson away from the battlefield.

The subplot follows the conflict existing among the strong-willed personalities of Travis, Bowie and Crockett. Travis stubbornly defends his decisions as commander of the garrison against the suggestions of the other two – particularly Bowie with whom the most bitter conflict develops. Crockett, well liked by both Bowie and Travis, eventually becomes a mediator between the other two as Bowie constantly threatens to withdraw his men rather than deal with Travis. Despite their conflicts, all three learn to subordinate their differences and in the end bind themselves together in an act of bravery to defend the fort against inevitable defeat.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Historical attempt to create the Alamo – fails to deliver on so many levels – Wayne in one of his weaker performances – Widmark does a better job as Jim Bowie – Wayne Directed and perhaps that was where it went wrong – I’m a big Wayne fan but this is not one of my favourites.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1960

“Elmer Gantry”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Elmer Gantry is a 1960 drama film about a con man and a female evangelist selling religion to small town America. Adapted by director Richard Brooks, the film is based on the 1927 novel of the same name by Sinclair Lewis and stars Burt Lancaster and Jean Simmons.

Lancaster won an Academy Award for his performance, as did co-star Shirley Jones.

The movie presents fewer than 100 pages of the novel, deleting many characters and fundamentally changing the character and actions of female evangelist Sharon Falconer, played by Simmons. The story’s use of a female evangelist bears a resemblance to true-life Sister Aimee Semple McPherson.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Elmer Gantry (Burt Lancaster) is a hard-drinking, fast-talking traveling salesman with a charismatic personality. He is drawn to the road show of Sister Sharon Falconer (Jean Simmons) and is immediately attracted to the saintly revivalist.

Gantry soon cons his way into Sister Sharon’s good graces and joins the troupe as a fiery preacher. Gantry and Falconer develop what her manager calls a “good cop/bad cop” routine, with Elmer telling the audience members that they will burn in Hell for their sins and Sharon promising salvation if they repent.

The group makes its way out of exclusively provincial venues and into Zenith, Winnemac, a larger city. Falconer eventually admits to Gantry that her real name is Katie Jones and that her origins are humbler than she publicly admits. Falconer also becomes Gantry’s lover and loses her virginity to him.

Gantry’s on-stage antics draw the attention of a big-city reporter, the skeptical Jim Lefferts (Arthur Kennedy). Lefferts is shown to be torn between his disgust for religious hucksterism and his genuine admiration for Gantry’s charm and cunning. The two men begin a public feud which increases the notoriety of both.

The success of the Falconer-Gantry team is mired by Lulu Baines (Shirley Jones), a former girlfriend of Elmer’s who fell into disrepute and became a prostitute when her affair with Gantry ruined her standing in her minister father’s eyes.

Gantry, acting as a moralist, unwittingly invades the brothel where Lulu works. With police and media in tow, he sends the prostitutes out of town. Lulu proceeds to frame Gantry out of revenge for this and out of jealousy for his relationship with Falconer.

Lulu blackmails him. Falconer is asked to bring $25,000 in exchange for the negatives of incriminating pictures. Falconer brings the money, but Lulu refuses to accept; it is unclear why she has had a change of heart.

Lulu had at first offered Lefferts the exclusive story of Gantry’s sexual indiscretion, but he refused, shrugging the pictures off as merely proof that Gantry is as human as anyone else. Later, when an angry mob threatens Gantry at the tent revival following the publication of the incriminating photos in another newspaper, Lefferts fights in Gantry’s defense.

Lulu joins the congregation at this tent revival and is a witness to Gantry’s humiliation. As she watches the mob curse Gantry and smear him with eggs and other produce, she is emotionally shaken and flees the scene.

Lulu returns to the brothel, which is now in a dilapidated state from Gantry’s publicity stunt. Her pimp, who with the photographer had helped frame Gantry, is there to collect the $25,000. Lulu tells him she did not take Falconer’s money, whereupon he beats her. Gantry comes to Lulu’s rescue. He disposes of the pimp and apologizes to Lulu, who then publicly confesses to having framed Gantry.

Elmer returns to Sharon on the night her new tabernacle opens. He wants them to live like a more normal couple. Sharon is unable to give up her soul-saving ventures, though, and insists that she and Elmer were brought together by God to do His work. Sharon then tragically dies in a fire at the tabernacle, unable or unwilling to see past her own religious zeal when the place is engulfed in flames.

Deeply saddened by Sharon’s death and having reached something of a moral awakening, Elmer decides to stop evangelizing, quoting from the Bible: “When I was a child, I understood as a child and spake as a child. When I became a man, I put away childish things.”

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

A gem of a movie – a sleeper as they say.  Lancaster was an actor with so much drive and passion – his oration of religious fervor during this performance even had tears in my eyes – Simmons as the ‘Angle deliverer’ is brilliant.  It was a forerunner to the ‘Billy Graham’ crusades to re-establish ‘old-time’ religion across middle America.

This movie delivers on so many levels and up against ‘The Apartment’ for Best Picture – there was a travesty of justice done here.

Highly Recommended viewing …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 7.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1960

“Sons and Lovers”

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Sons and Lovers is a British 1960 film adaptation of the D. H. Lawrence novel Sons and Lovers. It was adapted by T. E. B. Clarke and Gavin Lambert and directed by Jack Cardiff.[1] It stars Trevor Howard, Dean Stockwell, Wendy Hiller, Mary Ure, William Lucas and Donald Pleasence.

The film won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography (Freddie Francis) and was nominated for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Trevor Howard), Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Mary Ure), Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Black-and-White (Thomas N. Morahan, Lionel Couch), Best Director, Best Picture and Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium.

The film was also entered into the 1960 Cannes Film Festival.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Wikipedia has no PLOT synopsis …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

A very English Black and White where much was left to the music to excite the viewer about what was to follow … it turned out to be an updater version of the 1941 – ‘How Green was my Valley’ –

Trevor Howard plays his role as the ‘father’ who knows all and takes his position as head of the household more seriously then normal life would tolerate.   It’s a tame movie – and if you like english drama – this is disappointing – but then trying to put DH Lawerance into movie during the 60’s with censorship being what it was was always a hard ask.

Not my cup of tea …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 3.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1960

“Sundowners”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Sundowners is a 1960 film that tells the story of an Australian outback family torn between the father’s desires to continue his nomadic sheep-herding ways and the wife’s and son’s desire to settle down in one place. The movie stars Deborah Kerr, Robert Mitchum, and Peter Ustinov, with a supporting cast including Glynis Johns, Dina Merrill, Michael Anderson, Jr., and Chips Rafferty.

The film was adapted by Isobel Lennart from the novel by Jon Cleary and directed by Fred Zinnemann.

The Sundowners was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Actress in a Leading Role (Deborah Kerr), Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Glynis Johns), Best Director, Best Picture, and Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Irish-Australian Paddy Carmody is a roving sheep herder known as a “sundowner” (because he is constantly moving, pitching his tent wherever the sun goes down). His wife Ida and son Sean want to settle down, but Paddy is a wanderlust and never wants to stay in one place for long. While passing through the bush the family meet former sea captain, Rupert Venneker and hire him as an extra drover. The group drive a herd of sheep to a nearby town where they meet Mrs. Firth who takes a liking to Rupert.

Ida convinces Paddy to take a job at a station shearing sheep; she serves as the cook and Rupert is hired as wool roller. Ida enjoys the company of other women, growing close to the owner’s wife and taking care of one shearer’s pregnant wife. She is secretly saving all the money the family earns for a farm that she saw on the sheep drive. Paddy decides to leave midway through the shearing season, but Sean convinces him to stay. He wins a race horse in a bet that they name Sundowner and they race him, hoping to make more money. However, Sundowner is disqualified and they lose all the money they saved because Paddy bet it all on the horse. The family resolve to keep moving and hope that they will save enough money to buy a farm one day.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

I questioned the movie at the outset when Kerr and Mitchum were trying to play Australians in an Australian family setting.  The movie is similar to a later version called ‘Sunday Too Far Away’ staring Jack Thompson.

Zinnemann’s landscape backdrops made me feel at home as an Australian and the movie grew on me – about half way through Kerr and Mitchum began to sound and mimic Australians and that lended some authenticity.  The movie was enjoyable and Kerr as the strong ‘wife’ forever being short changed on life wants and ambitions by a wayward husband who does not want to settle down is believable.

Good viewing for Mitchum fans – one of his less stolit performances and with Ker as the ‘wife’ she brings out the best of him.   Australian Actors Rob Mellion and Chips Rafferty play supporting roles and Peter Ustinov is his ever demeaning self …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 5.5/10 …

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