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EYE-BALL MovieZone – Oscar Movies 1958…

October 3, 2011
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EYE-BALL MovieZone –
Oscar Movies 1958:
EYE-BALL MovieZoneThe Nominees for the Best Picture in 1958 were:

1958 Nominees:

[Oscar Best Picture Winner – highlighted – click Nominee Movie links provided to navigate your way up and down the page – each Movie has additional links to Bit Torrent “downloads’ links, Wikipedia Links for all the information about the nominated movie, and the EYE-BALL MovieZone Reviews and ratings. Movie posters appearing at this site have been copied from Wikipedia and other research related source sites.]

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1958

“Gigi”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Gigi is a 1958 musical film directed by Vincente Minnelli. The screenplay by Alan Jay Lerner is based on the 1944 novella of the same name by Colette. The film features songs with lyrics by Lerner; music by Frederick Loewe, arranged and conducted by André Previn.

In 1991, Gigi was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.” The American Film Institute ranked it #35 in AFI’s 100 Years… 100 Passions. The film is considered the last great MGM musical and the final great achievement of the Freed Unit, headed by producer Arthur Freed, although he would go on to produce several more films, including the musical Bells Are Ringing in 1960. The film was the basis for an unsuccessful stage musical produced on Broadway in 1973.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Set in turn-of-the-20th century Paris, the film opens with Honoré Lachaille (Maurice Chevalier) among high society in the Bois de Boulogne. A charming old roué, he cynically remarks that “Like everywhere else, most people in Paris get married, but not all. There are some who will not marry, and some who do not marry. But in Paris, those who will not marry are usually men, and those who do not marry are usually women.” So marriage is not the only option for wealthy young bon vivants like his nephew Gaston (Louis Jourdan), who is bored with life. The one thing Gaston truly enjoys is spending time with Madame Alvarez (Hermione Gingold), whom he calls Mamita, and especially her granddaughter, the precocious, carefree Gilberte, aka Gigi (Leslie Caron). Following the family tradition, Madame Alvarez sends Gigi to her sister, Great Aunt Alicia to be groomed as a courtesan and learn etiquette and charm. To Alicia, love is an art, and a necessary accomplishment for Gigi’s social and economic future. The young girl initially is a very poor student who fails to understand the reasons behind her education. She enjoys spending time with Gaston, whom she regards as an elder brother.

After Gaston publicly embarrasses his cheating mistress and tries to rebuild his reputation with endless parties, he decides to take a vacation by the sea. Gigi proposes if she beats him at a game of cards he must take her and Mamita along. He accepts, and she happily wins. During their holiday, Gigi and Gaston spend many hours together, and the two learn Honoré and Mamita once were romantically involved before becoming comfortable friends. Alicia insists Gigi’s education must increase dramatically if she is to catch a prize such as Gaston. Gigi is miserable with her lessons, but endures them as a necessary evil, though she still seems awkward and bumbling to her perfectionist grand-aunt. When Gaston sees Gigi in an alluring white gown, he tells her she looks ridiculous and storms out, but later returns and apologizes, offering to take her to tea to make amends. Mamita refuses, telling him a young girl seen in his company might be labeled in such a way as could damage her future. Enraged yet again, Gaston storms out and wanders the streets of Paris in a fury.

Realizing he has fallen in love with Gigi, who no longer is the child he thought her to be, Gaston returns to Mamita and proposes he take Gigi as his mistress, promising to provide the girl with luxury and kindness. The young girl declines the offer, telling him she wants more for herself than to be passed between men, desired only until they tire of her and she moves on to another. Gaston is horrified at this portrayal of the life he wishes to give her, and leaves stunned. Gigi later decides she would rather be miserable with him than without him. Prepared to accept her fate as Gaston’s mistress, Gigi emerges from her room looking like a woman. Gaston is enchanted and takes her to dinner at Maxim’s, where she seems perfectly at ease. The stares of other patrons make Gaston extremely uncomfortable as he realizes Gigi’s interpretation of things may have been accurate after all, and discovers his love for her makes the idea of her as his mistress an unbearable one. He leaves the party with Gigi in tow and takes her home without explanation. After wandering the streets throughout the night, he returns to Mamita’s home and humbly asks for Gigi’s hand in marriage.

The final sequence reverts to Honoré Lachaille, proudly pointing out Gaston and Gigi riding in their carriage in the Bois de Boulogne, which is filled with high society. The couple are elegant, beautiful, and happily married. Honoré has been a framing device for the film, which can be seen as a romantic victory of love over cynicism.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

A movie that has very much dated in plot terms – Maurice Chevalier is charming as always as the elder philanderer – teaching he ways to a younger version in Louis Jourdan who is also well cast.

In its day it was a very popular movie – French – Male conquests and the free loving a life of privilege could offer to peasant girls wanting to rise above their station.

Worth a look if you feel like an afternoon of nothingness – and just he hear the french accent of Chevalier …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.5.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1958

“Auntie Mame”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Auntie Mame is a 1958 film based on the novel by Patrick Dennis and its theatrical adaptation by Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee. This film version stars Rosalind Russell and was directed by Morton DaCosta. Mame, a musical version of the story, appeared on Broadway and was later made into a 1974 film starring Lucille Ball as the title character.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Patrick Dennis, orphaned in 1928 when his father unexpectedly dies, is placed in the care of Mame Dennis (Rosalind Russell), his father’s sister in Manhattan. Mame is a flamboyant, madcap woman, who hosts frequent parties with eclectic, bohemian guests. Patrick is quickly introduced to his aunt’s free-spirited and eccentric lifestyle, including Vera Charles, a lush of a Broadway actress, who spends many of her nights passed out in Mame’s guest room. Mame’s frequently repeated motto is “Life is a banquet, and most poor suckers are starving to death!”[1]

Since Patrick’s father was a wealthy man at the time of his death, Patrick’s inheritance comes with an executor, Mr. Dwight Babcock. Mr. Babcock disapproves of Mame’s lifestyle and wants to interject decorum and discipline in Patrick’s life. Mame has Patrick enrolled at a progressive school run by a friend of hers. Mr. Babcock insists that Patrick be enrolled at Bixby’s, a nearby boy’s prep school. When he finds out that Mame has not enrolled Patrick at Bixby’s, he issues an order: Patrick is to go to St. Boniface boarding school and Mame will only see him at the holidays and during the summer.

When Mame’s investments are lost in the stock market crash of 1929, she takes a series of jobs—stage acting, telephone operator, sales girl at Macy’s –that all end disastrously. At her sales job at Macy’s, she meets a man named Beaureguard Burnside, a rich oil man from the South. He’s immediately smitten with her and she falls in love with him as well. Mame and Patrick visit Beau’s family estate in Georgia. Sally Cato, who’s in love with Beau, tries to sabotage Mame’s relationship with Beau. She organizes a fox hunt, suspecting Mame is lying about being a horsewoman (and rightly so) and gives Mame a wild horse. Mame manages to stay on the horse and catches the fox at the end. Beau proposes to her on the spot in front of his family.

For their honeymoon, Beau and Mame travel around the world. Mame is sad about leaving Patrick, but they keep in touch through letters and frequent visits during holidays. Through their correspondence, Mame gets a sense that Patrick is growing into a stuffy, conventional man, and she worries for him. When Beau dies while they are climbing the Matterhorn, Mame comes home. Patrick surprises her by installing a dictating machines and a secretary, Agnes Gooch, for her convenience. He and her friends convince her to write her autobiography.

Patrick and Lindsay, a friend of Mame’s, arrange for a collaborator (and ghost writer) for Mame, a Mr. Brian O’Bannion. It becomes clear that O’Bannion is using Mame as a meal ticket; Mame dictates her life to Agnes and both of them are hard at work on her autobiography, while O’Bannion does nothing. One day, as he tries to get fresh with Mame (apparently to retain her favor lest she kick him out), Patrick walks in on them and disapproves. He announces that he has a girlfriend, Gloria, and wants to bring her over to meet Mame. He cautions Mame to act responsibly while Gloria is there. She calls him beastly and he almost leaves, but at the last minute Mame says she will do whatever he wants to make him and Gloria happy.

Patrick thanks her—for agreeing to behave (and possibly for everything she’s done for him) — and goes to bring Gloria. Meanwhile, O’Bannion insists Mame get dressed for a party to meet movie producers interested in Mame’s autobiography. Mame hurriedly dresses the dowdy Agnes up and tells O’Bannion that Agnes is an heiress merely doing secretarial work for “life experience.” O’Bannion’s mercenary instincts kick in and he gladly escorts Agnes to the party in Mame’s place. When Agnes returns the next day, she is disheveled and remembers very little of her night with O’Bannion—only that she thinks she saw a movie with a wedding scene in it.

Patrick brings Gloria over, but Mame is horrified to see how upper-crust and snobby she is. Against Patrick’s wishes, she goes to visit Gloria’s family in a Connecticut gated community. Her parents are just like Gloria, and Mame wants nothing to do with them.

Mame arranges a dinner party at her apartment and she invites Gloria, her parents, and Mr. Babcock…and a few of Mame’s closest friends, including Vera, Lindsay and the man who runs the progressive school Patrick used to attend. On the night of the party, Patrick meets Peguine, Mame’s new secretary—Agnes is now several months pregnant and staying with Mame in “her friendless condition.” Everything about the evening is a disaster—the food, the drink, the furniture, and the company. Lindsay surprises the attendees with the galleys from Mame’s autobiography; the madcap content leads Gloria to insult the other attendees; Patrick defends them, attacking Gloria’s friends instead. In a bizarre twist, the release of the book prompts a telegram from O’Bannion, requesting his efforts be rewarded, efforts that can be proven by his wife—Agnes Gooch O’Bannion!!! The evening ends with Babcock also having a go at Mame, but Mame puts him in his place.

Cut to several years later, with Patrick and Peguine now a married couple. Their son Michael wants to travel with Mame on her trip to India. The two of them wear down Patrick and Peguine’s objections, and the movie fades away as Mame tells Michael of all the wondrous sights they will see.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

I found this movie hard to fathom and less enjoyable to watch – the overbearing Auntie Mame is just too  much during the first 20 minutes – I found Roslind Russell too much and a big negative in trying to enjoy the movie – was worse than watching Liberace – it did not get much better for me from thereon in.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 3.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1958

“Cat on a Hot Tin Roof”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is a 1958 American drama film directed by Richard Brooks.[1][2] It is based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams adapted by Richard Brooks and James Poe. One of the top-ten box office hits of 1958, the film stars Elizabeth Taylor, Paul Newman and Burl Ives.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Late one night, a drunken Brick Pollitt (Paul Newman) is out trying to recapture his glory days of high school sports by leaping hurdles on a track field, dreaming about his moments as a youthful athlete. Unexpectedly, he falls, leaving him dependent on a crutch. Brick, along with his wife, Maggie “the Cat” (Elizabeth Taylor), are seen the next day visiting his family in Mississippi, waiting to celebrate Big Daddy’s (Burl Ives) 65th birthday.

Depressed, Brick decides to spend his days inside drinking while resisting the affections of his wife, who taunts him about the inheritance of Big Daddy’s wealth. Numerous allusions are made as to their tempestuous marriage – the most haunting of these are speculations as to why Maggie does not yet have children, while Brick’s brother Gooper (Jack Carson) and his wife Mae (Madeleine Sherwood) have a whole clan, many of which run around the “plantation” (as Big Daddy’s estate is called) unsupervised and singing obnoxiously.

Big Daddy and Big Mama (Judith Anderson) arrive home from the hospital and are greeted by Gooper and his wife, along with Maggie. Despite the efforts of Mae, Gooper and their kids to draw his attention to them, Big Daddy has eyes only for Maggie. The news is that Big Daddy is not dying from cancer. However, the doctor later meets privately with Brick and Gooper and divulges that it is a deception, but the family wants him to remain happy. Maggie begs Brick to put care into getting his father’s wealth, but Brick stubbornly refuses. When Big Daddy is fed up with his alcoholic son’s behavior, he demands to know why he is so stubborn. Brick angrily refuses to answer.

Big Daddy forces the issue, dragging Maggie into the conversation and the revealing moment ensues when Maggie tells what happened the night Brick’s friend Skipper committed suicide. Maggie reveals she was jealous of Skipper because he had more of Brick’s time. She claimed she wanted to ruin their relationship “by any means necessary”. She intended to seduce Skipper and put the lie to his relationship with her husband. She got scared and ran away without going through with it. Brick claimed to blame Maggie for Skipper’s death, but it is revealed that he actually blames himself for not helping Skipper when he called Brick in a hysterical state.

Big Daddy learns that he will die from cancer and that this birthday will be his last. Shaken, he retreats to the basement. Meanwhile, Gooper, his wife, Maggie, and Brick argue over Big Daddy’s will. Finally, Brick descends into the basement, a labyrinth of antiques and family possessions hidden away. Once he finds his father, Brick and Big Daddy confront each other before a large cut-out of Brick in his glory days as an athlete. The rest of the family begins to crumble under pressure, with Big Mama stepping up as a strong figure. Maggie says that she’d like to give Big Daddy her birthday present: the announcement of her being pregnant. After being called a liar by Mae, Big Daddy and Brick defend her lie, even though they know it to be untrue. Even Gooper finds himself admitting “That girl’s got life in her, alright.” In the end, she and Brick reconcile, and the film ends with the two kissing with the implication that they will make love.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

One of my all time favourites – Paul Newman and Elizabeth Taylor – both at their prime – with Burl Ives as the dying and overbearing father/father in law.

The plot is deep and real – the jealous brother and scheming wife – the noisy brats of children and the ignorant wife who just loves her husband for what he represents – ‘Big Daddy’ –

A wonderful ensemble production with scripts actors die for – and it’s about the eternal subject that sustains us all – the family and its true value – love and what happens when it turns against you –

Highly recommended viewing. (I have no idea why this never won the Best Picture when matched up against ‘Gigi’ and the other nominees.)

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 7.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1958

“The Defiant Ones”

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Defiant Ones is a 1958 drama film which tells the story of two escaped prisoners, one white and one black, who are shackled together and who must co-operate in order to survive. It stars Tony Curtis, Sidney Poitier, Theodore Bikel, Cara Williams, Charles McGraw, and Lon Chaney, Jr. Ivan Dixon was a stunt double for Sidney Poitier

The film was adapted by Harold Jacob Smith from the story by Nedrick Young, originally credited as Nathan E. Douglas. It was directed by Stanley Kramer.

Carl “Alfalfa” Switzer, of the Our Gang comedies, has a small role. It was his last before his death.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Two prisoners in the American South, African-American Noah Cullen (Poitier) and John “Joker” Jackson (Curtis), escape from a chain gang. Despite their mutual loathing for each other, they are forced to cooperate, as they are chained together. Gradually, they begin to respect and like each other.

Cullen and Joker flee through difficult terrain and weather, with a brief stop at a village where they attempt to break into a general store, in hopes of obtaining food and tools to break the chain that holds them together. Instead, however, they are captured by the townspeople, who form a lynch mob; they are saved only by the interference of “Big” Sam (Chaney), a man who is appalled by his neighbors’ bloodthirst. Sam persuades the townspeople to lock the convicts up and turn them in in the morning, but that night, he secretly releases them, after revealing to them that he is also a former chain-gang prisoner.

Finally, they run into a young boy named Billy. They make him take them to his home and his mother (Williams), whose husband has abandoned his family. The escapees are finally able to break their chains. When they spend the night there, the lonely woman is attracted to Joker and wants to run off with him. She advises Cullen to go through the swamp to reach the railroad tracks, while she and Joker drive off in her car. The men agree to split up. However, after Cullen leaves, the woman reveals that she had lied – she sent Cullen into the dangerous swamp to die to eliminate any chance he would be captured and perhaps reveal where Joker had gone. Furious, Joker runs after his friend; as he leaves, Billy shoots him.

Wounded, Joker catches up to Cullen and warns him about the swamp. As the posse led by humane Sheriff Max Muller (Bikel) gets close, the escapees can hear the dogs hot on their trail. But they also hear a train whistle and run towards the sound. Cullen hops the train and tries to lift Joker on as well, but is unable to drag him aboard. Both men tumble to the ground. Too exhausted to run anymore, they realize all they can do is wait for their pursuers. The sheriff finds Cullen singing defiantly and Joker nearly passed out in his arms.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Curtis and Poitier were made for better movies than this – shot in black and white – they play escaped prisoners chained together trying to avoid capture – very dated and tough to watch … have to be in the right mood to watch a movie like this … hard and pointed – lots of subtle messages most race related …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1958

“Seperate Tables”:

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Summary: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Separate Tables is a 1958 American drama film based on two one-act plays by Terence Rattigan that were collectively known by this name. It was directed by Delbert Mann, and adapted by Rattigan, John Gay and an uncredited John Michael Hayes. Mary Grant designed the film’s costumes.

The film took the two plays and opened it up for a screenplay that introduced some new parts. It stars Rita Hayworth, Deborah Kerr, David Niven, Wendy Hiller, and Burt Lancaster. It was nominated for seven Oscars, winning two (Niven for Best Actor and Hiller for Best Supporting Actress).[2]

Burt Lancaster was also co-producer (Hill-Hecht-Lancaster Productions). Rita Hayworth was married to James Hill at the time.

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Wikipedia do not have a plot review.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Have not been able to find a copy of this movie to review …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: Not Rated … unseen

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