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EYE-BALL MovieZone – Oscar Movies 1955 …

September 23, 2011
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Oscar Movies 1955:
EYE-BALL MovieZoneThe Nominees for the Best Picture in 1955 were:

1955 Nominees:

[Oscar Best Picture Winner – highlighted – click Nominee Movie links provided to navigate your way up and down the page – each Movie has additional links to Bit Torrent “downloads’ links, Wikipedia Links for all the information about the nominated movie, and the EYE-BALL MovieZone Reviews and ratings. Movie posters appearing at this site have been copied from Wikipedia and other research related source sites.]

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1955

“Marty”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The film stars Borgnine as Marty Piletti, a heavy-set Italian-American butcher who lives in The Bronx, New York City with his mother. Unmarried at 34, the good-natured but socially awkward man faces constant badgering from family and friends to get married, pointing out that all his brothers and sisters are already married with children. Not averse to marriage but disheartened by his lack of prospects, Marty has reluctantly resigned himself to bachelorhood. In spite of his failed love life, Marty maintains an optimistic outlook on life characterized by his frequent ejaculatory outbursts such as “Perfect!” or “Fantastic!”

After being harassed by his mother into going to the Stardust Ballroom one Saturday night, Marty connects with Clara, a plain schoolteacher, who is quietly weeping on the roof after being callously abandoned at the ballroom by her blind date. Spending the evening together dancing, walking the busy streets, and talking in a diner, Clara and Marty discover many affinities. He eagerly spills out his life story and ambitions, and they encourage each other. He brings Clara to his house, and they awkwardly express their mutual attraction, shortly before his mother returns. Marty, delighted with his new-found love, takes her home by bus, promising to call her at two o’clock the next afternoon, after mass. In an exuberant scene, he punches the bus stop and weaves between the cars, looking for a cab, a rare luxury matching his mood.

Meanwhile, his cranky, busybody widowed aunt moves in to live with Marty and his mother. She warns his mother that living alone, when children marry, is a widow’s fate. Fearing that Marty’s romance could spell her abandonment, his mother belittles Clara. Marty’s friends, with an undercurrent of envy, deride Clara for her plainness and try to convince Marty to forget her. Harangued into submission, Marty doesn’t call Clara.

That night, back in the same lonely rut, Marty realizes that he is giving up a chance of love with a woman who makes him happy. Over the objections of his friends, he dashes to a phone booth to call Clara, who is disconsolately watching television with her parents. When his friend Angie asks what he’s doing, Marty bursts out saying:
“ You don’t like her. My mother don’t like her. She’s a dog and I’m a fat, ugly man. Well, all I know is I had a good time last night. I’m gonna have a good time tonight. If we have enough good times together, I’m gonna get down on my knees and I’m gonna beg that girl to marry me. If we make a party on New Year’s, I got a date for that party. You don’t like her? That’s too bad! Hey Ang, when are you going to get married? You’re 33 years old, and all your kid brothers and sisters are married. You oughta be ashamed of yourself.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

This movie won the Oscar the year I was born and I had never seen it previously until I started this project. I’ve never seen Borgnine play a part like this – he’s sensitive, caring, and really is a nice guy looking for love. He’s approaching middle-age and is just about given up in finding a girl – he hangs out with his life long friends who are all the same loser type and hand-fisted when it comes to knowing how to talk to a girl.

I loved the movie and it showed me a different side to Borgnine’s talents as opposed to all the tough guy stuff he did during my lifetime.

I highly recommend the download and be prepared to be educated – the same awkward stuff we see today was happening way back then. One of the things this research has given me is that we are not unique in having to face daunting times – previous generations all went through their own stuff.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 7.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1955

“Love is a Many-Splendored Thing”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The widowed Eurasian doctor Han Suyin (Jones) falls in love with the married-but-separated American correspondent Mark Elliott (Holden) in Hong Kong, during the period of China’s Communist Revolution. While they find brief happiness, she is ostracized by her Chinese community and he dies after being transferred to Korea, at the start of war.

Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing is a 1955 American drama-romance film. Set in 1949-50 Hong Kong, it tells the story of a married, but separated, American reporter (played by William Holden), who falls in love with a Eurasian doctor originally from China (played by Jennifer Jones), only to encounter prejudice from her family and from Hong Kong society.

The movie was adapted by John Patrick from the 1952 novel A Many-Splendoured Thing by Han Suyin. The film was directed by Henry King.

The movie later inspired a television soap opera in 1967, though without the hyphen in the show’s title.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Passable but not one of Holden’s best performances …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1955

“Mr Roberts”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The film takes place on an American Naval cargo ship the, USS Reluctant, during the waning days of World War II. The ship’s captain, Lieutenant Commander Morton (James Cagney), is proud of his spotless record supplying the U.S. fleet. His command style is heavy-handed: he refuses to let the crew remove their shirts during hot days working in the cargo hold and has not granted his men ”liberty” for at least two years, despite frequent requests by his executive officer, Lieutenant Douglas Roberts (Henry Fonda). Roberts has an excellent relationship with the crew, often bending the rules to allow them some leeway. For Morton’s reputation for timely handling of cargo, an impressed admiral gave him a palm tree, which he cherishes and keeps in a dirt-filled bucket near the ship’s bridge. However, the crew despises the tree and the captain himself and it is widely known by the crew that Roberts, not Morton, is primarily responsible for the ship’s efficiency.

Roberts, despite his positive outlook, has grown tired of his dull duties and has repeatedly requested transfer to a unit on the front lines of the Pacific theatre. Morton has turned down every request.

Roberts bypasses the chain of command to request crew liberty from one of Morton’s superiors. Liberty is granted and the ship sails to a South Pacific island, but Morton denies the crew their small vacation. Morton shows Roberts a Commander’s hat with the scrambled eggs (gold braids) on the visor. Morton feels that if the ship continues to set cargo records the admiral will give Morton a promotion to Commander. He tells Roberts he will allow liberty for the crew as long as he agrees not to write any more letters to Command regarding disharmony aboard the ship.

A heated exchange results, with Roberts calling Morton ignorant, arrogant and ambitious; a man whose success is based on other men’s hard work. Roberts has had enough and ask for a court martial to finally be able to leave, but Morton relents. Morton reveals that he endured a tough childhood as a busboy, constantly bullied by those of higher social status during his time on passenger ships in the Merchant Marine, especially people who were college-educated like Roberts and thus has a deep personal hatred of “college boys” (Roberts left medical school to enter the Navy). The captain knows the ship’s reputation for success is due to Roberts and not himself, and he is determined to keep Roberts on board by fair means or foul. Morton grants the crew their liberty on the conditions that Roberts not request transfer ever again and that he will deal much more firmly with the crew. Roberts reluctantly acquiesces for the sake of the crew’s liberty.

On the island, the ship’s crew acts deplorably: they quickly get drunk, start fights, violently crash a party at the local embassy and are often hauled back to the ship by the Army’s military police. One sailor steals a motorcycle and the ship’s secretary, Dolan (Ken Curtis), steals a Navy Goat belonging to Admiral Wentworth, USN. Eventually, a large unit of the Navy’s shore patrol arrives and surrounds the ship, preventing any of the crew from going ashore. The next morning, Morton returns to the ship from a dressing-down by the port admiral. Morton boards the ship yelling about having been told to leave port immediately.

The men of the ship are mystified by Roberts’ new strict attitude. Morton falsely hints to them that Roberts is interested in a promotion. When a crew member informs Roberts of a new Navy policy which might assist him in getting a transfer despite the captain’s opposition, Roberts responds sharply and refuses to take advantage of it. Roberts’ friendly rapport with the crew is affected.

News of the Allied victory in Europe arrives and Roberts becomes further depressed, knowing the war may end soon without him seeing any combat. His mood breaks soon after, having been inspired by a radio speech. He takes the captain’s palm tree and throws it overboard. Morton, unable to determine who did it, orders the crew to battle stations. He eventually realizes that Roberts is the only person who would have the nerve. He summons Roberts to his quarters and begins accusing him, but Roberts calmly denies any involment, which only serves to make Morton more angry, resulting in Morton becoming ill. (It is implied that Morton vomits from the stress). Because a microphone has been left open during the confrontation, the crew overhears the conversation and learns the truth.

Several weeks later, Roberts receives a transfer, even though he had kept his bargain with the captain and not requested one. The ship’s doctor confides to Roberts that the crew had risked court-martial by submitting a forged transfer request. Before Roberts leaves, the crew made him a medal, Order of the Palm, for “action against the enemy”.

Several weeks later, Ensign Pulver (Jack Lemmon), a lazy, self-serving, and meek junior officer who shared a cabin with Roberts and has taken his place as cargo chief, receives a pair of letters. One is from Roberts himself who speaks enthusiastically about his new assignment on the front lines near Okinawa, and respect for the men on the Reluctant for refusing to surrender to a force as deadly as combat: boredom. He goes on saying that he is looking at the medal and would rather have it than the Medal of Honor. The second letter, from “Forenel” a friend of Pulver’s on the destroyer, USS Livingston, the same ship as Mr. Roberts, informs him that Roberts was killed in combat. “A Japanese kamikaze hits a 40mm battery and goes through into the wardroom, Doug was getting a cup of coffee.” A furious and emboldened Pulver throws the captain’s second palm tree overboard and marches into Morton’s cabin, angrily demanding to know why Morton has canceled the showing of a film that night. Morton realizes things will be just as tough with Pulver as they were with Roberts.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

A good wholesome Naval wartime comedy – it’s similar to “The Caine Mutiny” of 1954 fame without the ‘real’ lunacy.  Cagney is great as is Fonda and Lemmon and the Doc.  If you like a Men’s movie where comaraderie abounds – this ticks all the boxes.

Recommended viewing – use the download links above to get your copy.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 5.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1955

“Picnic”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The plot covers a 24-hour period. Hal Carter (William Holden) is a former college football star, adrift and unemployed after army service and a failed Hollywood acting career. On Labor Day (September 5, 1955), he arrives by freight train in a Kansas town to visit his fraternity buddy, Alan Benson (Cliff Robertson), the son of a wealthy grain elevator owner, Mr. Benson (Raymond Bailey). Working for his breakfast by doing chores in the backyard of kindly Mrs. Potts (Verna Felton), Hal stops paperboy Bomber (Nick Adams) from pestering neighbor Madge Owens (Kim Novak), who happens to be dating Alan. Her single-parent mother (Betty Field) is hoping Madge will marry Alan, which would thus raise both Madge and herself into the town’s highest, respectable social circles. Alan wants to marry Madge, but his father thinks she is beneath him. Madge tells her mother she doesn’t love Alan and is weary of being liked only because she is pretty.

Hal gets along wonderfully with almost everyone, and Alan is very happy to see “good old Hal,” whom he takes to the family’s sprawling grain elevator operations. He promises Hal a steady job as a “wheat scooper” (though Hal is disappointed he is not made an executive) and invites Hal to the town’s Labor Day picnic. Hal is wary about going to the picnic, but Alan nudges him into it, saying Hal’s “date” for the picnic will be Madge’s bookish younger sister Millie (Susan Strasberg), who is quickly drawn to Hal’s cheerful outlook and charisma. Alan reassures Mrs. Owens that although Hal flunked out of school and lost his football scholarship because he didn’t study, there are no worries about him. The afternoon carries on very happily, until Hal carelessly starts talking about himself too much and Alan stops him with a cutting remark. As the sun goes down, everyone wanders off. Millie draws a sketch of Hal and tells him she secretly writes poetry. Hal’s behavior towards her is friendly and utterly trustworthy, but his replies show he has no understanding of her world at all. Madge is named the town’s annual Queen of Neewollah (“Halloween” spelled backwards), and Hal longingly gazes at her as she is brought down the river in a swan-shaped pedal-boat. They shyly say “Hi” to each other as she glides by.

Middle-aged schoolteacher Rosemary (Rosalind Russell), who rents a room at the Owens house, has been brought to the picnic by store owner Howard Bevens (Arthur O’Connell). When the band plays dance music, Howard says he can’t dance, so Rosemary dances with Millie. Hal and Howard then start dancing together, which nettles Rosemary. She grabs Howard, who then dances with her. Hal tries to show Millie a dance he learned in Los Angeles, but Millie can’t quite get the beat. Madge stumbles upon this, begins clapping handily to the beat, and the two begin dancing together. Having been cast aside and ignored by both Rosemary and Hal, Millie sulks off and starts drinking from a whiskey flask hidden in Howard’s jacket. Rosemary, drunk from the same whiskey, jealously breaks up the dance between Madge and Hal. Rosemary flings herself at Hal, saying he reminds her of a Roman gladiator. When Hal tries to ward off the schoolteacher, she rips his shirt then bitterly calls him a bum. Mrs. Owens and Alan show up and think Hal has caused a messy scandal, made all the worse when Millie breaks down, screaming, “Madge is the pretty one!” and becomes ill from the whiskey. Rosemary, still blinded by her anger, tells Mrs. Owens that Hal gave Millie the whiskey, while Howard’s plea that he brought the whiskey seems to fall on deaf ears. By now a crowd is watching, and Hal flees into the darkness.

Madge follows Hal to Alan’s car and gets in with him. He angrily tells her to go home. However, she won’t budge, so he drives off with her to town. By the river he tells her he was sent to reform school as a boy for stealing a motorcycle and that his whole life is a failure. Madge kisses Hal, which astonishes him. They promise to meet after she gets off work at six the next evening. Hal drives back to Alan’s house to return the car, but Alan has called the police and wants Hal arrested. After trying to talk things out, Hal flees the house in Alan’s car with the police following close behind. Leaving the car back by the river, Hal goes into the water, gets away from them and shows up at Howard’s apartment, asking to spend the night there. Howard is very understanding and now has his own worries: a highly distraught, desperate and remorseful Rosemary has begged him to marry her. Back at the Owens house, Madge and Millie cry themselves to sleep in their shared room.

The next morning, Howard comes to the Owens house, intending to tell Rosemary he wants to wait, but at the sight of him she becomes overjoyed, thinking he has come to take her away. Flustered in front of the whole household and other schoolteachers, Howard wordlessly goes along with this. As he passes Madge on the stairs, he tells her Hal is hiding in the backseat of his car. Hal is able to slip away before the other women gleefully paint and attach streamers and tin cans to Howard’s car, throwing rice and asking him where he’ll take Rosemary for their honeymoon. As Howard and Rosemary happily drive off to the Ozarks, Hal and Madge meet by a shed behind the house. He asks her to meet him in Tulsa, where he can get a room and a job at a hotel as a bellhop and elevator operator. Mrs. Owens finds them by the shed and threatens to call the police. Hal runs to catch a passing freight train, crying out to Madge, “You love me! You love me!”

Upstairs in their room, Millie tells Madge to “do something bright” for once in her life and go to Hal. Madge packs a small suitcase and, despite her mother’s tears (but also nudged on by Mrs. Potts), boards a bus for Tulsa.[3]

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

A low key paupers story where Holden plays the railroad tramp come to town – who lands in a place where the women in a home have no men.  Holden fits all their dreams and the story becomes a bouncing affair for his affections.

Holden has come to town to meet an old college friend – hopeful of bumming a job – unimaginative and very dated … not one of my favourite movies even though I like Holden as an actor.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1955

“The Rose Tattoo”:
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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The film begins with Serafina Delle Rose (Anna Magnani) proudly praising her husband Rosario (David Newell) to her female neighbours in a shopping market, before revealing that she is pregnant with their second child. When she goes home with her shopping she finds Rosario asleep in bed and whispers to him that she is with child. Emerging from his room she finds a young woman named Estelle (Virginia Grey) at the door who wants her to make a shirt for her lover from some expensive silk material she has bought. It transpires that Rosario is her lover as, when Serafina is out of the room, she steals a photograph of him from Serafina’s sideboard before departing.

Later that night Rosario is out working (he is a van driver) and Serafina is busy working on the shirt for her customer. The women of the neighbourhood discover that Rosario has been killed in a road accident whilst trying to speed away from the police; it transpires that he was smuggling something illegal. When Serafina discovers her beloved husband’s demise she collapses, and later the local doctor informs her daughter Rosa (Marisa Pavan) and the women of the neighbourhood that Serafina has miscarried.

Three years later Serafina is a recluse, having withdrawn from the world. She has allowed her appearance to deteriorate. That particular day is the day of the high school graduation and the women of the neighbourhood are impatiently banging on her front door for their daughters’ graduation dresses. Rosa is also begging for her graduation dress from her mother, but Serafina has locked them—along with the rest of Rosa’s clothes—away. As all the girls are late for school, Rosa’s teacher turns up in the neighbourhood demanding to know what is keeping them. She goes to the Delle Rose household and eventually makes Serafina see sense and she hands all the girls their dresses.

After much thought Serafina decides to attend her daughter’s graduation and, comically, tries to get ready. During this time two women arrive asking if Serafina can quickly mend their bandanas for a festival they are going to. Serafina reluctantly does so, but is appalled by their talk of men and reprimands them however. However one of the women, Bessie (Jo Van Fleet), takes offence and decides to inform Serafina that her late husband was no saint; quite the contrary he was having an affair. Serafina does not go to the graduation ceremony after this revelation, but instead sits alone in the dark until Rosa comes home. She is infuriated when Rosa introduces her to her new boyfriend Jack Hunter (Ben Cooper) and insists that she will never see him again.

Rosa then runs away with Jack in disgust at her mother’s actions, before a van driver named Alvaro (Burt Lancaster) turns up asking for lodgings. A reluctant Serafina allows him to stay for the night and the two proceed to get drunk. As Alvaro flatters Serafina with compliments she begins to talk of her late husband, mentioning that he used to have a rose tattooed on his chest. Later that night Alvaro returns, having got a rose tattooed on his chest. Serafina is disgusted and goes to throw him out, stating that he is dishonouring Rosario’s memory. Seeing the look of discomfort on his face at the mention of her late husband’s name, Serafina goes to question him if he knew Rosario or not. Alvaro is uncomfortable, and Serafina goes on to ask him if he was unfaithful to her. When he does not respond she throws him out of the house.

The next day Serafina goes to visit Father De Leo and asks him if anyone had confessed to him about having an affair with Rosario three years previously. The priest insists that he cannot divulge this information, but the look on his face says it all for Serafina and she begins to persist that he tell her. Things get so bad that she is thrown out of the chapel, and as a result she is mocked by her female neighbours who she has come to alienate from her.

Depressed, Serafina meets Alvaro and insists that he drive her to a club her husband used to attend. Once there she meets Estelle who asked her to make a silk shirt for her lover and guesses correctly that she was having an affair with him. Estelle confesses that she was having an affair with Rosario before proceeding to show Serafina the rose tattooed on her chest as a symbol of her love for Rosario. Returning home she smashes Rosario’s urn containing his ashes and gives Alvaro the silk shirt that the woman had wanted made for Rosario, before inviting him to spend the night with her.

Alvaro turns up hours later at the Delle Rose household intoxicated and, mortified by her actions, Serafina leaves him in a drunken stupor and retires to bed. That night Rosa returns home and falls asleep on the sofa. As Alvaro awakes from his drunken stupor he sees Serafina’s beautiful daughter lying there asleep and moves over to kiss her. As he does Rosa wakes up and screams, before confronting her mother as to why there is a strange man in the house.

Serafina gets rid of him, but the following morning she finds him on top of a telephone pole outside her house begging for her forgiveness. Serafina and Rosa are extremely embarrassed and Serafina refuses to leave the house in order to make him come down, much to Rosa’s frustration. At that moment Jack arrives and asks Serafina if he can marry Rosa. Serafina is stunned, but seeing that this is what Rosa wants she gives them her consent and they leave to be married. Serafina then calls Alvaro down from the telephone pole before declaring in front of her neighbours that they have to pick up from where they left off the night before. As they enter the house Serafina puts on the radio whilst Alvaro pours them a drink and they laugh together.

The premier of the movie was held at the Hotel Astor, New York on December 2, 1955, with the attendance of Arthur Miller, Marlon Brando, Marilyn Monroe and Jayne Mansfield among other celebrities

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

No recommendation from me for this movie.   The first 20 minutes is about a group of women all arguing about what dress to wear and gossip over nothing that I could make any sense of  – lost me straight away – I did not even get to when Lancaster entered …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 3.0/10 …

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