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EYE-BALL MovieZone – Oscar Movies 1949 …

September 20, 2011
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EYE-BALL MovieZone –
Oscar Movies 1949:
EYE-BALL MovieZoneThe Nominees for the Best Picture in 1949 were:

1949 Nominees:

[Oscar Best Picture Winner – highlighted – click Nominee Movie links provided to navigate your way up and down the page – each Movie has additional links to Bit Torrent “downloads’ links, Wikipedia Links for all the information about the nominated movie, and the EYE-BALL MovieZone Reviews and ratings. Movie posters appearing at this site have been copied from Wikipedia and other research related source sites.]

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1949

“All The King’s Men”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

All The King’s Men is the story of the rise of politician Willie Stark (Broderick Crawford) from a rural county seat to the governor’s mansion. He first teaches himself law and becomes a lawyer, championing the local people and gaining popularity. He then decides to go into politics. Along the way he loses his innocence, and becomes as corrupt as the politicians he once fought against.

The main story is a thinly disguised version of the rise and assassination of real-life 1930s Louisiana Governor, Huey Long. Also included is a series of complex relationships between a journalist friend who slowly sours to his ways, the journalist’s girlfriend (who has an affair with Stark), her brother (a top surgeon), her uncle (a top judge who is appointed AG but eventually resigns).

When his son becomes paralyzed following a drunk driving accident which kills a female passenger, Stark’s world starts to unravel and he discovers that not everyone can be bought off.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

A hard movie to watch – the lead character comes across as the good guy who becomes corrupted by power and his want to stay in power – the hidden messages about corrupt politicians and how they survive and the deals they do to self promote and line their pockets were a prevalent in society as they are today.

From that perspective alone – the story has appeal and the characters play their parts well – the movie was nominated 7 times and won 3 Academy Awards including Best Picture, Best Actor and Best Supporting Actress. Again it is a hard movie – no soft moments but then in politics – take no prisoners is a way of life.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 5.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1949

“Battleground”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Battleground is a 1949 American war film that tells the story of the 2nd Squad, 3rd Platoon of Item Company, 327th Glider Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, trying to cope with the Siege of Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge in World War II. It stars Van Johnson, John Hodiak, Ricardo Montalban and George Murphy, and features James Whitmore. It was directed by William Wellman from a script by Robert Pirosh.

The film is notable for portraying American soldiers as vulnerable and human, as opposed to just inspirational and gung-ho. While there is no question about their courage and steadfastness, each soldier has at least one moment in the film when he seriously considers running away, schemes to get sent away from the front line, slacks off, or complains about the situation he is in. Battleground is considered to be the first significant film about World War II to be made and released after the end of the war.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

The movie has its moments – but the action scenes are poor for the era and relies on the characters to overcome poor backdrops and outdoor settings. It struggles to hold viewers and has dated – Val Johnson does his best to carry the movie – but at best he was a B grade actor during his time … not a big fan of the movie but when you build a collection – not all the items can be considered ‘gems’ – this is certainly not a gem.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1949

“The Heiress”:

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Catherine Sloper (Olivia de Havilland) is a plain, painfully shy woman whose emotionally detached father (Ralph Richardson) makes no secret of his disappointment in her. When she meets the charming Morris Townsend (Montgomery Clift), she immediately is taken by the attention that he lavishes upon her, attention she so desperately seeks from her father. Catherine falls madly in love with Morris and they plan to marry.

Catherine’s father believes Morris is courting Catherine only to get her inheritance and threatens to disinherit her if she marries him. Catherine does not care, and plans to elope with Morris but not before telling him about her father’s decision. On the night they are to elope, Catherine eagerly waits at home for Morris to come and take her away, but he never arrives.

Catherine is heartbroken. A day or so later, she has a bitter argument with her father, who reveals he is dying. She tells her father she still loves Morris and challenges him to change his will if he’s afraid of how she will spend his money after he dies. He does not and dies a short time later, leaving her his entire estate.

A few years later, Morris returns from California, having made nothing of himself and eyeing the Slopers’ luxurious house with more obvious eagerness. Again he professes his love for Catherine, claiming that he left her behind because he could not bear to see her destitute. Catherine pretends to forgive him and tells him she still wants to elope as they originally planned. He promises to come back that night for her, and she tells him she’ll start packing her bags.

When Morris returns, Catherine takes her revenge. She calmly orders the maid to bolt the door, leaving Morris locked outside, shouting her name. Her aunt asks her how she can be so cruel, and she responds, “I have been taught by masters.” The film fades out with Catherine silently ascending the stairs while Morris’ despairing cries echo unanswered through the darkness.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Shot in Black and White – the movie takes some time to engage its audience – but all is revealed as the movie moves on. Set in aristocracy – Olivia de Havilland plays the role of unmarried daughter desperate for a husband – mostly at her fathers urging.  She is awkward and then enters Montgomery Cliff as the suitor.  It’s a clumsy first meeting and both reveal their awkwardness’ to each other.

The movie developes but this whole opening ambit – 15 minutes or so is difficult to push through.  The movie gathers some depth and becomes more enjoyable.  It’s a bumbling storyline of love and love lost – If you like Cliff or de Havilland they give very creditable performances.

The Movie received 8 Academy Award nominations, winning 4 including Best Actress for de Havilland –

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: Not Yet Rated …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1949

“A Letter to Three Wives”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Just as they are about to take a group of underprivileged children on a riverboat ride and picnic, Deborah Bishop (Jeanne Crain), Rita Phipps (Ann Sothern), and Lora Mae Hollingsway (Linda Darnell) receive a message from Addie Ross informing them that she has run off with one of their husbands. She, however, leaves them in suspense as to which one. All three marriages are shown in flashback to be strained.

Deborah grew up on a farm. Her first experience with the outside world came when she joined the Navy WAVES during World War II, where she met her future husband Brad (Jeffrey Lynn). When they first return to civilian life, Deborah is ill at ease in Brad’s upper class social circle. Adding to her insecurity, she learns that everyone expected Brad to marry Addie, whom all three husbands consider practically a goddess.

However, she is comforted by Brad’s friend Rita, a career woman who writes stories for sappy radio soap operas. Her teacher husband George (Kirk Douglas) feels somewhat emasculated since she earns much more money. He is also disappointed that his wife constantly gives in to the demands of her boss, Mrs. Manleigh (Florence Bates).

Lora Mae grew up poor, not just on the “wrong side of the tracks”, but literally next to the railroad. (Passing trains shake the family home periodically.) She has set her sights on her older employer, Porter (Paul Douglas), the wealthy owner of a statewide chain of department stores. Her mother, Ruby Finney (Connie Gilchrist), is unsure what to think of her daughter’s ambition, but Ruby’s friend (and the Bishops’ servant) Sadie (an uncredited Thelma Ritter) approves. After a year, he lets Lora Mae know he is onto her game. She freely admits she is after his money. When he refuses to marry her, she quits to try again elsewhere. However, he loves her too much, and finally gives in.

When the women return from the picnic, Rita is overjoyed to find her husband at home. They work out their issues; she promises to no longer be pushed around by the radio people and to pay George more attention. Deborah’s houseman gives her a message from Addie stating that Brad will not be coming home that night.

A heartbroken Deborah goes out to dinner with the other two couples. When Porter complains about his wife dancing with another man, she tells him he has no idea how much Lora Mae really loves him, but Porter is certain his wife only sees him as a “cash register”. Unable to take it anymore, Deborah gets up to leave, announcing that Brad has run off with Addie. Porter stops her, confessing it was he who started to run away with Addie, but then explains, “A man can change his mind, can’t he?” Porter then tells his wife that, with his admission in front of witnesses, she can divorce him and get what she wants. To his shock, Lora Mae claims she did not hear a word he said. He asks her to dance.

The voice of Addie Ross bids all a good night. In the film, she is shown only once from behind.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Shot in Black and White – the movie is set in upper middle class where housewives play their silly games of ‘my life is better than yours’.  t’s theme is reproduced in modern TV reality shows like ‘Wives of Orange County’.

It’s a flowing storyline where the men are talked about more than stealing any scenes.  Kirk Douglas plays his usual ladies man style but the story is about the three wives and their friend who left and as a parting gift wrote a single letter to all three telling them she had run off with one of their husbands.

It’s a chick flick, one of the first made and was a tought battle to watch it all the way through.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.5/10…

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1949

“12 O’Clock High”:

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Twelve O’Clock High is a 1949 American war film about aircrews in the United States Army’s Eighth Air Force who flew daylight bombing missions against Nazi Germany and occupied France during the early days of American involvement in World War II. The film was adapted by Sy Bartlett, Henry King (uncredited) and Beirne Lay, Jr. from the 1948 novel by Bartlett and Lay. It was directed by King and stars Gregory Peck, Hugh Marlowe, Gary Merrill, Millard Mitchell, and Dean Jagger.

The film was nominated for four Academy Awards and won two: Dean Jagger for Best Actor in a Supporting Role, and Thomas T. Moulton for Best Sound Recording.[1] In 1998, Twelve O’Clock High was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

One of the better real reflective WWII movies made – real footage shot by both sides of the conflicf was used in making the movie.  Gregory Peck starts as the Squadron Commanded struggling with decisions of WAR that translates to mens lives lost.  The crews that fly the bombers play their roles well – showing the stress of the constant missions and exposure to harm –

The film captures the realism of what it is to fight in deadly combat from 10,000 ft above the ground … the air combat scenes are real and the landing crashes are also taken from real footage.  Peck is excellent in his role – thrust upon him when the Squadron loses its skipper.

The mover is in Black and White and this does not detract in anyway – well worth the download.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 5.5/10 …

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