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EYE-BALL MovieZone – Oscar Movies 1951 …

September 19, 2011
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EYE-BALL MovieZone – Oscar Movies 1951:
EYE-BALL MovieZoneThe Nominees for the Best Picture in 1951 were:

1951 Nominees:

[Oscar Best Picture Winner – highlighted – click Nominee Movie links provided to navigate your way up and down the page – each Movie has additional links to Bit Torrent “downloads’ links, Wikipedia Links for all the information about the nominated movie, and the EYE-BALL MovieZone Reviews and ratings. Movie posters appearing at this site have been copied from Wikipedia and other research related source sites.]

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1951

“An American In Paris”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Jerry Mulligan (Gene Kelly), an American World War II veteran, is now an exuberant expatriate in Paris trying to make a reputation as a painter. His friend, Adam (Oscar Levant), is a struggling concert pianist who is a long time associate of a French singer, Henri Baurel (Georges Guétary). A lonely society woman, Milo Roberts (Nina Foch), takes Jerry under her wing and supports him, but is more interested in Jerry than his art. Jerry remains oblivious to her feelings and falls in love with Lise (Leslie Caron), a French girl he meets at a restaurant. Lise loves him as well but she is already in a relationship with Henri, to whom she feels indebted for having saved her family during World War II.

At a raucous masked ball, with everyone in black-and-white costumes, Milo learns that Jerry is not interested in her, Jerry learns that Lise is in love with him but is marrying Henri the next day, and Henri overhears their conversation. When Henri drives Lise away, Jerry daydreams about being with her all over Paris, his reverie broken by a car horn, the sound of Henri bringing Lise back to him.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

A musical love story – worth a look if its your type of movie … has dated badly …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 5.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1951

“Decision Before Dawn”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

By late 1944, it is obvious that the Germans will lose the war. Colonel Devlin (Gary Merrill) leads a military intelligence unit that recruits German prisoners of war to spy on their former comrades. “Tiger” (Hans Christian Blech), a cynical older thief and ex-circus worker, is willing to work for whichever side is winning. On the other hand, “Happy” (Oskar Werner) is a young idealist who volunteers after his friend is killed by fanatical fellow prisoners for voicing doubts about the war’s outcome. Monique (Dominique Blanchar) trains Happy and the others in espionage techniques; she takes a liking to the young man, despite her hatred for Germans.

One day, Devlin receives word that a German general is willing to negotiate the surrender of his entire corps. Naturally, this is given top priority; because of the importance of the mission, an American officer has to go along. Devlin selects Lieutenant Rennick (Richard Basehart), a newcomer who distrusts the German turncoats. Tiger is chosen because he is the only one who knows the area, but he is under suspicion after returning from his last mission without his teammate. Happy is assigned the related task of locating the 11th Panzer Corps, which might oppose the wholesale defection. They parachute out of the same plane, then split up.

In the course of his search, Happy encounters Germans with differing attitudes towards the war, some resigned, like Hilde (Hildegard Knef), a few still defiant, such as Waffen SS courier Scholtz (Wilfred Seyferth). Happy accomplishes his mission by a stroke of luck. Posing as a medic returning to his unit, he is commandeered to treat Oberst von Ecker (O.E. Hasse), the commander of the 11th Panzer.

Afterwards, he is sought by the Gestapo. Narrowly escaping capture, Happy makes his way to a safe house where the other two agents are hiding out. Meanwhile, Tiger and Rennick have learned that the general they were to contact was supposedly injured, but the hospital where he has been taken is under SS guard; without him, the other German officers cannot and will not act.

The radio is knocked out, so they are forced to try to swim across a heavily-defended river to get to the American lines with the vital information. At the last moment, Tiger loses his nerve and runs away, forcing Rennick to shoot him. He and Happy then swim to an island in the middle of the river. When they start for the other shore, they are spotted by the German defenders. Happy creates a diversion, is captured and executed as a deserter, but his sacrifice enables the lieutenant to make it to safety, with a changed attitude about some Germans.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

War drama with all the necessary action and drama scenes to make it work … worth the download.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1951

“A Place in the Sun”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

George Eastman (Montgomery Clift), the poor nephew of rich industrialist Charles Eastman (Herbert Heyes), takes a job in his uncle’s factory. Despite George’s family relationship to the owner, the rich Eastman family treats him as an outsider and gives him the humblest job available in the factory and no entree into their exclusive social circle. George, uncomplaining, hopes to impress his uncle—whom he addresses as “Mr. Eastman”—with his hard work and earn his way up. While working in the factory, George starts dating fellow factory worker Alice “Al” Tripp (Shelley Winters), in defiance of the workplace rules. Al is a poor and inexperienced girl who is dazzled by George and slow to believe that his Eastman name brings him no advantages.

While stepping out with Al, George meets “society girl” Angela Vickers, played by Elizabeth Taylor, and they quickly fall in love. Being Angela’s escort thrusts George into the intoxicating and carefree lifestyle of high society that his rich Eastman kin had denied him. When Al announces that she is pregnant and makes it clear that she expects George to marry her, he temporizes, spending more and more of his time with Angela and his new well-heeled friends. An attempt to procure an abortion for Al fails, and Al renews her insistence on marriage. George is invited to join Angela at the Vickers’s holiday lake house and excuses himself to Al, saying that the visit will advance his career and accrue to the benefit of the coming child.

George and Angela spend time at secluded Loon Lake, and after hearing a story of a couple’s supposed drowning there, with the man’s body never being found, George hatches a plan to rid himself of Al so that he can marry Angela.

Meanwhile, Al finds a picture in the newspaper of George, Angela, and their friends, and realizing that George lied to her about being forced to go to the lake, she meets George in the nearby town and threatens to expose everything to his society friends if he doesn’t marry her. They quickly drive to City Hall to elope but they find it closed for Labor Day, and George suggests spending the day at the nearby lake; Al unsuspectingly agrees.

When they get to the lake, George acts visibly nervous when he rents a boat from a man who seems to deduce that George gave him a false name; the man’s suspicions are aroused more when George asks him whether any other boaters are on the lake (none are). While they are out on the lake, Al confesses her dreams about their happy future together with their child. As George apparently takes pity on her and, judging from his attitude, decides not to carry out his murderous plan, Al tries to stand up in the boat, causing it to capsize, and Al drowns.

George escapes, swims to shore, and eventually drives back up to the Vickers’s lodge, where he tries to relax but is increasingly tense. He says nothing to anyone about having been on the lake or about what happened there. Meanwhile, Al’s body is discovered and her death is treated as a murder investigation almost from the first moment, while an abundant amount of evidence and witness reports stack up against George. Just as Angela’s father approves Angela’s marriage to him, George is arrested and charged with Al’s murder. Though the audience knows that the planned murder in fact turned into an accidental drowning, George’s furtive actions before and after Al’s death condemn him. His denials are futile, and he is found guilty of murder and sentenced to death in the electric chair. Near the end, he confesses in his cell that he deserves to die because he could have saved Al, but chose not to.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Black and White movie with strong performances by Cliff, Taylor and Winters … Perry Mason character [Burr] appears as the Prosecutor pursuing the death penalty – Cliff’s character is a twisted tormented male who gets caught up with a work colleague [Winters] who falls pregnant – and wants to marry – the father [Cliff] has his eyes on another woman who is all class and very wealthy [Taylor] – in desperation the father plans to murder the pregnant girlfriend and things go wrong when he recants and an accident happens and she dies anyway. The prosecutor pursues Cliff and he eventually is captured – Taylor’s family support her but she still loves him – he is finally sent to the gas chamber and the story ends … without his innocence being revealed.

The plot and script make for good viewing – Taylor is excellent as is Cliff and Winters – it won 6 Academy Awards none for Acting accreditation – the story ends poorly – and has many loose ends – good viewing and well worth the time if you love Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Cliff performances –

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1951

“Quo Vadis”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The action takes place in ancient Rome from AD 64–68, a period after Emperor Claudius’ illustrious and powerful reign, the new corrupt and destructive Emperor Nero ascends to power and eventually threatens to destroy Romes’ previous peaceful order.The main subject is the conflict between Christianity and the corruption of the Roman Empire, especially in the last period of the Julio-Claudian line. The characters and events depicted are a mixture of actual historical figures and situations and fictionalized ones.

The film tells the story of a Roman military commander, Marcus Vinicius (Robert Taylor), returning from the wars, who falls in love with a devout Christian, Lygia (Deborah Kerr), and slowly becomes intrigued by her religion. Their love story is told against the broader historical background of early Christianity and its persecution by Nero (Peter Ustinov). Though she grew up Roman as the adopted daughter of a retired general, Aulus Plautius (Felix Aylmer), Lygia is technically a hostage of Rome. Marcus persuades Nero to give her to him for services rendered. Lygia resents this, but still falls in love with Marcus.

Meanwhile, Nero’s atrocities become increasingly more outrageous and his acts more insane. When he burns Rome and blames the Christians, Marcus goes off to save Lygia and her family. Nero captures them and all the Christians, and condemns them to be killed in the arena. However, Marcus’ uncle, Petronius (Leo Genn), Nero’s most trusted advisor, warns that the Christians will be made martyrs and, tired of Nero’s insanity and suspecting that he might become a victim of his antics too, commits suicide by slitting his wrists, sending Nero a farewell letter in which he finally communicates his derisive opinions he had never been able to tell the emperor in fear of his own life. Marcus is arrested for trying to save Lygia. In prison, Peter (Finlay Currie), who has also been arrested, marries the couple; eventually, Peter is crucified upside-down.

Poppaea (Patricia Laffan), Nero’s wife, who lusts after Marcus, devises a diabolical revenge for his rejection of her. Lygia is tied to a wooden stake in the arena. A wild bull is also placed there, and Lygia’s bodyguard giant, Ursus (Buddy Baer) must try to kill it with his bare hands, otherwise Lygia will be gored to death. Marcus is tied to the spectator’s box and forced to watch, much to the horror of his officers, who also attend the spectacle. When all seems hopeless, Ursus is able to break the bull’s neck. Hugely impressed by Ursus’ courage, the crowd exhorts Nero to spare them, which the emperor is not willing to do. However, Nero’s four other retainers Seneca (Nicholas Hannen), architect Phaon (D. A. Clarke-Smith), Lucan (Alfredo Varelli), and Terpnos (Geoffrey Dunn) vouch for the mob’s demands by putting their thumbs up as well. Marcus then breaks free of his bonds, leaps into the arena, frees Lygia with the help of his loyal troops, and announces that General Galba is at that moment marching on Rome, intent on replacing Nero.

The crowd, now firmly believing that Nero, and not the Christians, is responsible for the burning of Rome, revolts. Nero flees to his palace, where he strangles Poppaea to death, blaming her for attempting to scapegoat the Christians. Then Acte (Rosalie Crutchley), a Christian palace slave who was once in unrequited love with Nero, appears and offers to aid him in ending his own life before the mob storms the palace. The cowardly Nero cannot bring himself to do it, so Acte drives the dagger into his chest, weeping over his demise.

Marcus, Lygia and Ursus are now free and leave Rome. By the roadside, Peter’s crook has miraculously sprouted flowers. The radiant light intones, “I am the way, the truth, and the life.”

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Had dated badly … Robert Taylor is not one of my favourite actors and does an OK job here – his love interest Kerr outshines him in most of the scenes …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1951

“A Streetcar Named Desire”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

As in Tennessee Williams’ play, the film presents Blanche DuBois (Vivien Leigh), a fading, but nevertheless attractive Southern belle, whose pretensions to virtue and culture only thinly mask her alcoholism and delusions of grandeur. Her poise is an illusion she presents to shield others, and most of all herself, from her reality in an attempt to make herself still attractive to new male suitors. Blanche arrives from her hometown of Auriol, Mississippi (changed from Laurel in the play) at the apartment of her sister, Stella Kowalski (Kim Hunter), in the French Quarter of New Orleans, on Elysian Fields Avenue; the local transportation she takes to arrive there includes a streetcar route named “Desire.” The steamy, urban ambiance is a shock to Blanche’s nerves.

Explaining that her ancestral southern plantation, Belle Reeve in Auriol, Mississippi, has been “lost” due to the “epic debauchery” of her ancestors, Blanche is welcomed with some trepidation by Stella, who fears the reaction of her husband, Stanley Kowalski (Marlon Brando). Blanche says her supervisor gave her time off her job as an English teacher because of her upset nerves. In truth, however, she was fired for having an affair with a 17-year-old male student. This turns out not to be the only seduction she had engaged in — and these problems led Blanche to run away from Auriol. A brief marriage scarred by the suicide of her spouse, Allan Grey, has led Blanche to live in a world in which her fantasies and illusions are seamlessly mixed with her reality.

In contrast to both the self-effacing and deferential Stella and the pretentious refinement of Blanche, Stella’s husband, Stanley, is a force of nature: primal, rough-hewn, brutish and sensual. He dominates Stella in every way and is physically and emotionally abusive. Stella tolerates his primal behaviour as this is part of what attracted her in the first place; their love and relationship is heavily based on powerful, even animalistic, sexual chemistry – something Blanche says she finds impossible to understand, despite long glances of admiration and lust towards Stanley. The arrival of Blanche upsets her sister’s and brother-in-law’s system of mutual dependence. Stella’s concern for her sister’s well-being emboldens Blanche to hold court in the Kowalski apartment, infuriating Stanley and leading to conflict in his relationship with his wife. Stanley’s friend and Blanche’s would-be suitor, Harold “Mitch” Mitchell (Karl Malden), is trampled as Blanche and Stanley head for a collision course. Stanley discovers Blanche’s past through a co-worker who travels to Auriol frequently. He confronts Blanche with the things she has been trying to put behind her, partly out of concern that her character flaws may be damaging to the lives of those in her new home (just as they were in Auriol), and partly due to resentment of her airs of superiority toward him and a distaste for pretense in general. However, his attempts to “unmask” her are predictably cruel and violent.

Their final confrontation — a rape — results in Blanche’s nervous breakdown. Stanley has her committed to a mental institution. The reference to the streetcar named Desire — providing the aura of New Orleans geography — is symbolic. Blanche not only has to travel on a streetcar route named “Desire” to reach Stella’s home on “Elysian Fields” but her desire acts as an irrepressible force throughout the play — she can only hang on as her desires lead her. Mitch, knowing that Stanley raped Blanche and had her committed to a mental institution, lashes out and punches Stanley but is held back by the other men, he starts to weep but when the other men stare at Stanley he claims he “never once touched her”.

Devastated with her sister’s fate, Stella weeps and rejects Stanley’s intention to comfort her and pushes him away. Stella runs out to see Blanche off, but is too late, as the car Blanche left in has already gone. As he cries her name once more (“Stella! Hey, Stella!”), Stella clings to her child and vows that she is “never going back” to Stanley again. She goes upstairs once more in order to seek refuge with her neighbor, Eunice, as Stanley continues to call her name.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Not one of my favourite movies – Brando overacts his role as he does in most of his movies – I don’t rate him the star others do – this is a good script and well directed for the most part … recommended viewing …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.5/10 …

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