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EYE-BALL MovieZone – Oscar Movies 1950 …

September 19, 2011
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EYE-BALL MovieZone –
Oscar Movies 1950:
EYE-BALL MovieZoneThe Nominees for the Best Picture in 1950 were:

1950 Nominees:

[Oscar Best Picture Winner – highlighted – click Nominee Movie links provided to navigate your way up and down the page – each Movie has additional links to Bit Torrent “downloads’ links, Wikipedia Links for all the information about the nominated movie, and the EYE-BALL MovieZone Reviews and ratings. Movie posters appearing at this site have been copied from Wikipedia and other research related source sites.]

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1950

“All About Eve”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

At an awards dinner, Eve Harrington (Anne Baxter) — the newest and brightest star on Broadway — is being presented the Sarah Siddons Award for her breakout performance as Cora in Footsteps on the Ceiling. Theatre critic Addison DeWitt (George Sanders) observes the proceedings and, in a sardonic voiceover, recalls how Eve’s star rose as quickly as it did.

The film flashes back a year. Margo Channing (Bette Davis) is one of the biggest stars on Broadway, but despite her success she is forty and bemoaning her age, knowing what it will mean for her career. After a performance one night, Margo’s close friend Karen Richards (Celeste Holm), wife of the play’s author Lloyd Richards (Hugh Marlowe), meets besotted fan Eve Harrington in the cold alley outside the stage door. Recognizing her from having passed her many times in the alley (as Eve claims to have seen every performance of Margo’s current play, Aged in Wood), Karen takes her backstage to meet Margo. Eve tells the group gathered in Margo’s dressing room — Karen and Lloyd, Margo’s boyfriend Bill Sampson (Gary Merrill), a director who is eight years her junior, and Margo’s maid Birdie (Thelma Ritter) — that she followed Margo’s last theatrical tour to New York after seeing her in a play in San Francisco. She tells a moving and involving story of a difficult life, including being orphaned and losing her young husband in the recent war. She is becomingly humble and flattering in her idolization of Margo. In response, Margo quickly befriends Eve, moves her into her home, and offers her a job as her assistant, leaving Birdie, who instinctively dislikes Eve, feeling put out.
Anne Baxter in wig and costume as Margo Channing’s understudy

While maintaining a seamless outward appearance of humility and a desire only to serve, Eve is gradually shown to be working to supplant Margo, scheming to become her understudy behind her back (driving wedges between Margo and Lloyd and between Margo and Bill) and conspiring with an unsuspecting Karen to cause Margo to miss a performance. Eve, knowing in advance she will go on, invites the city’s theatre critics to the play that night, which is a triumph. Eve makes a pass at Bill, but he rejects her. Following a scathing newspaper column by Addison, Margo and Bill reconcile, dine with the Richardses, and decide to marry. That same night at the restaurant, Eve blackmails Karen into telling Lloyd to give her the part of Cora, threatening to tell Margo of Karen’s role in Margo’s missed performance. Before Karen can act, Margo announces to everyone’s surprise that she does not wish to play Cora and would prefer to continue in Aged in Wood, even being willing to take it on tour. Eve secures the role and attempts to climb higher by using Addison, who is beginning to doubt her veracity. Just before the premiere of her play at the Shubert in New Haven, Eve presents Addison with her next plan: to marry Lloyd, who, she claims, has come to her professing his love and his eagerness to leave his wife for her. Now, Eve exults, Lloyd will write brilliant plays designed for her. Addison is infuriated that Eve has attempted to use him and reveals that he knows her back story is all lies. Her real name is Gertrude Slojinski, and she is no war widow, no orphan, no follower of Margo’s tour. Before meeting Margo, she had been paid to leave town after her affair with her boss, a brewer in Wisconsin. Addison blackmails Eve, informing her that she will not be marrying Lloyd or anyone else; in exchange for Addison’s silence, she now “belongs” to him.

The film returns to the opening scene in which Eve, now a shining Broadway star headed for Hollywood, is presented with her award. In her speech, she thanks Margo and Bill and Lloyd and Karen with characteristic effusion, while all four stare back at her coldly. After the awards ceremony, Eve hands her award to Addison, skips a party in her honor, and returns home alone, where she encounters a young fan who has slipped into her apartment and fallen asleep. The young girl professes her adoration and, as if without Eve’s noticing it, begins at once to insinuate herself into her life. “Phoebe” (Barbara Bates), as she calls herself, answers the door to find Addison returning with Eve’s award. Addison leaves without entering and, while Eve rests in the other room, Phoebe dons Eve’s elegant costume robe and poses in front of a multi-paned mirror, holding the award as if it were a crown. The mirrors transform Phoebe into multiple images of herself, and she bows regally, as if accepting the award to thunderous applause, while triumphant music plays.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Bette Davis shines as the aging actress who has never got over her falling star – nominated for 14 Academy Awards – winning 6 – this was the most number of Nominations by any movie until Titanic came along in 1997.

Watching these old classic movies I have been able to discover what many moviegoers knew at the time – stats like Davis, Hepburn, Garson, Kelly, and many more are every bit the stars of any modern day actress. In fact I would say much better – technology is giving us back these movies in vivid production and when strong scripts and great acting come together – then movies are the winner. This was a great Bette Davis movie and just to see her performance was worth the download.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 6/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1950

“Born Yesterday”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Uncouth tycoon Harry Brock (Broderick Crawford) goes to Washington, D.C. with his brassy mistress, Emma ‘Billie’ Dawn (Judy Holliday), and his crooked lawyer, Jim Devery (Howard St. John), to “influence” a politician or two. The lawyer also presses Harry to marry Billie on the grounds that a wife cannot testify against her husband.

Harry becomes disgusted with Billie’s ignorance and lack of manners (though he himself is much worse) and hires a tutor for her, journalist Paul Verrall (William Holden). Blossoming under Paul’s encouragement, Billie turns out to be much smarter than anybody knew and begins thinking for herself. The two fall in love.

Meanwhile, Devery had persuaded Harry to sign over many of his assets to Billie to hide them from the government. When Harry needs to get them back, he comes into conflict with Billie’s new-found independence. She and Paul use her leverage to escape from Harry’s domination; she promises to give him back his property little by little as long as he leaves them alone. Billie and Paul marry.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Nothing of note to write about …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 3.0/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1950

“Father of the Bride”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Following the wedding of his daughter Kay, Stanley T. Banks, a suburban lawyer, recalls the day, three months earlier, when he first learned of Kay’s engagement to Buckley Dunstan: At the family dinner table, Kay’s casual announcement that she is in love with Buckley and has accepted his proposal makes Stanley feel uneasy, but he soon comes to realize that his daughter has grown up and the wedding is inevitable. While Ellie, Kay’s mother, immediately begins making preparations for the wedding, Stanley lies awake at night, fearing the worst for his daughter.

Stanley’s misgivings about the marriage eventually make Ellie anxious, and she insists that Kay introduce them to Buckley’s parents. Kay calls the tradition “old-fashioned rigamarole,” but arranges the meeting nevertheless. Before the introduction, Stanley has a private conversation with Buckley, and is pleased to learn that the young man is the head of a small company and that he is capable of providing a comfortable life for Kay. The Bankses’ first meeting with Doris and Herbert, Buckley’s parents, gets off to an awkward start, and goes from bad to worse when Stanley drinks too much and falls asleep in the wealthy Dunstans’ living room.

Following Kay and Buckley’s engagement party, Stanley, who misses the entire party because he is in the kitchen mixing drinks, realizes that his plans for a small wedding have been swept aside and he will be expected to pay for an extravagant wedding “with all the trimmings.”As costs for the June event spiral out of control, Stanley calculates that he can afford to accommodate no more than one hundred and fifty guests. The task of paring down the guest list proves too difficult, however, and Stanley reluctantly consents to a 250-person reception.

The plans for a lavish wedding continue until the day that Buckley tells Kay that he wants to take her on a fishing trip in Nova Scotia for their honeymoon. Kay reacts to the announcement with shock and calls off the wedding, but she and Buckley soon reconcile, and the two families begin their wedding rehearsals. On the day of the wedding, chaos reigns at the Banks home as final preparations are made for the reception. The wedding ceremony brings both joy and sorrow to Stanley, as he realizes that his daughter is now a woman and no longer his child. The following day, Ellie and Stanley survey the mess in their home and concur that the entire affair was a great success.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Spencer Tracey and Elizabeth Taylor as Father and Daughter are great chemistry – their billing power made this movie the success it was – neither received Actor Nominations but their reputations made it a success anyway. A delightful Drama/Comedy and well worth the download to see the original version.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 6.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1950

“King Solomon’s Mines”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Allan Quatermain (Stewart Granger), an experienced hunter and guide, is reluctantly talked into helping Elizabeth Curtis (Deborah Kerr) and her brother John Goode (Richard Carlson) search for her husband, who had disappeared in the unexplored interior of Africa on a quest to find the legendary mines. They have a copy of the map he used. A tall, mysterious native, Umbopa (Siriaque), joins the safari. During the grueling journey, Elizabeth and Allan begin falling in love.

The party encounters Van Brun (Hugo Haas), a lone white man living with a tribe. They learn that he met Curtis. However, when Allan recognises him as a fugitive who cannot afford to let them go, they take him hostage to leave the village safely. Van Brun tries to shoot Allan, killing his faithful right hand man Khiva (Kimursi). Allan dispatches Van Brun and the party flees from the angry villagers.

When they finally reach the region where the mines are supposed to be, they are met by people who resemble Umbopa. They discover that their companion is royalty; he has returned to attempt to dethrone the evil King Twala (Baziga). Umbopa leaves with his supporters, while Allan, Elizabeth and John travel to a tense meeting with Twala. With his last rifle bullet, John kills a would-be attacker, temporarily quelling the natives.

The king’s advisor, Gagool (Sekaryongo), communicates that they have seen Curtis and leads them to a cave that contains a trove of jewels and in which they find the skeleton of Elizabeth’s husband. While they are distracted by this discovery, Gagool takes the opportunity to leave and triggers a booby trap that seals them in the cave. However, leaving the jewels behind, they find a way out through an underground stream and return to the settlement, just as Umbopa and his followers arrive.

Umbopa’s people have an unusual method of deciding the kingship. The two claimants duel to the death. Despite cheating by one of Twala’s men, Umbopa wins. Afterwards, he provides an escort for his friends’ return trip.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Stewart Granger is one of my favourite actors – yet in this movie he fails to shine – the camera is always to wide taking in the African scenery and the movie loses direction many times because of this – I did not really enjoy the movie and had to force myself to watch to the end … Kerr is also below her best …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 3.5/10 …

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1950

“Sunset Boulevard”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The story follows the life of struggling young Hollywood screenwriter Joseph C. Gillis (Holden) as he is ensnared by long-forgotten silent-film star Norma Desmond (Swanson) into being her kept man. The film begins with a scene of Joe’s dead body floating in the swimming pool of Norma’s palatial mansion on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood before flashing back to the beginning of the story’s events. Joe narrates the film even though he is no longer alive.

The first few scenes describe Joe’s unsuccessful efforts to borrow money from his friends after failing to persuade Paramount Pictures producer Sheldrake (Clark) to buy his most recent script, which Sheldrake’s assistant Betty Shaefer (Olson) dislikes. Joe’s meeting with Norma and her stoic German butler Max (von Stroheim) is occasioned by a car chase in which he flees from repossession men, having fallen behind on his loan payments. When one of his car’s tires blows out in front of Norma’s mansion, he hides the car in her garage, and when he tells her he is a writer, she asks him to help her write a script for a film that she hopes will revive her faded acting career.

With no other options except a low-paying newspaper job in Ohio, Joe agrees to help Norma. He objects when she has Max move his belongings from his apartment to her mansion, but she has paid his overdue rent, so he accepts the situation and begins living at the mansion, first in a room over the garage, then in the mansion itself. As he works on Norma’s script, he becomes financially dependent upon her. She lavishes attention on him and buys him expensive clothing, including a tailcoat for a private New Year’s Eve party attended only by the two of them. Horrified to learn that she has fallen in love with him, he escapes to a party at a friend’s house, where he meets Betty Schaefer again. While still unimpressed with most of his work, she believes one scene in one of his scripts has potential. However, Joe leaves the party and returns to the mansion when he discovers that Norma has attempted suicide.

When Norma considers her script to be complete, she sends it to Cecil B. DeMille at Paramount and waits for his answer. Coincidentally, Gordon Cole, of Paramount’s Props Department, begins calling. Thinking he is one of DeMille’s underlings, she refuses to speak to him. Eventually, she has Max drive her and Joe to the studio in her Isotta-Fraschini, a rare vintage luxury car. While DeMille entertains Norma, Joe and Max learn that Cole had called because the studio wants to rent her car and has no interest in her script. Max insists that they hide these facts from her, as he hides the fact that he has faked her recent fan mail.

Meanwhile, Joe has secretly begun to work with Betty on a screenplay, and she falls in love with him. When Norma discovers this, she phones Betty and insinuates what sort of man Joe really is, and Joe invites Betty to the mansion to see for herself. After Betty leaves the mansion, Joe begins packing, having decided to return to Ohio. He ignores Norma’s threats to shoot herself, and she shoots him as he leaves, leaving him dead in the pool as in the first scene. By the time the police arrive, she has become lost in fantasy. When she reacts positively to the presence of news cameras, Max convinces her that she is on the set of her new film. Norma dramatically descends her grand staircase, makes a short speech, and delivers the film’s most famous line: “All right, Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my close-up.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

A weak movie with a weak story line …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 3.0/10 …

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