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EYE-BALL MovieZone – Oscar Movies 1929 …

September 18, 2011
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EYE-BALL MovieZone –
Oscar Movies 1929:
EYE-BALL MovieZoneThe Nominees for the Best Picture in 1929 were:

1929 Nominees:

[Oscar Best Picture Winner – highlighted – click Nominee Movie links provided to navigate your way up and down the page – each Movie has additional links to Bit Torrent “downloads’ links, Wikipedia Links for all the information about the nominated movie, and the EYE-BALL MovieZone Reviews and ratings.]

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1929

“The Broadway Melody”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Broadway Melody (also known as The Broadway Melody of 1929[1]) is a 1929 American musical film and the first sound film to win an Academy Award for Best Picture. It was one of the first musicals to feature a Technicolor sequence, which sparked the trend of color being used in a flurry of musicals that would hit the screens in 1929-1930. Today the Technicolor sequence is presumed lost and only a black and white copy survives in the complete film. The film was the first musical released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and was Hollywood’s first all-talking musical.

The film was written by Norman Houston and James Gleason from a story by Edmund Goulding, and directed by Harry Beaumont. Original music was written by Arthur Freed and Nacio Herb Brown, including the popular hit “You Were Meant For Me”. The George M. Cohan classic “Give My Regards To Broadway” is used under the opening establishing shots of New York City, its film debut. Bessie Love was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance.

The plot involves the romances of musical comedy stars, set against the backstage hubbub of a Broadway revue. Anita Page and Bessie Love play a vaudeville sister act who have come to New York for their big break on Broadway. Charles King plays the song-and-dance man whose affection for one sister (Harriet alias Hank) is supplanted by his growing love for the younger, more beautiful sister (Queenie). Queenie tries to protect her sister and derail the love triangle by dating a wealthy but unscrupulous “stage door Johnny.”

The movie opens with Eddie Kearns debuting “The Broadway Melody.” He tells some chorus girls he’s brought the Mahoney Sisters to New York to perform it with him in Francis Zanfield’s latest revue. Hank and Queenie Mahoney are awaiting Eddie’s arrival at their apartment. Hank, the older sister, prides herself on her business sense and talent while Queenie is lauded for her beauty. Hank is confident they will make it big while Queenie is less eager to put everything on the line to be stars. Their Uncle Jed arrives to tell them he’s gotten them a job with a 30-week traveling show. Hank tells him they’re not interested but he says he’ll give them time to think it over.

Eddie, who is engaged to Hank, arrives and sees Queenie for the first time since she was a girl and is instantly taken with her. He tells them to come to rehearsal for Zanfield’s revue to present their act. Zanfield isn’t interested in it but says he might have a use for Queenie, who begs him to give Hank a part as well. She also convinces him to pretend Hank’s business skills won him over. Eddie witnesses this exchange and becomes even more enamored of Queenie for her devotion to her sister. During dress rehearsal for the revue Zanfield says the pacing is too slow for “The Broadway Melody” and cuts Hank and Queenie from the number. Meanwhile, another girl is injured after falling off a prop and Queenie is selected to replace her. Nearly everyone is captivated by Queenie, particularly notorious playboy Jacques “Jock” Warriner. While Jock begins to woo Queenie, Hank is upset that Queenie is building her success on her looks rather than her talent.

Over the next couple weeks Queenie spends a lot time with Jock, of which Hank and Eddie fervently disapprove. They forbid her from seeing him, which results in Queenie pushing them away and deterioration of the relationship between the sisters. Queenie is only with Jock to fight growing feelings for Eddie but Hank thinks she’s setting herself up to be hurt. Eventually, Eddie and Queenie confess their love for each other but Queenie, unwilling to break her sister’s heart, runs off to Jock once again.

Hank, after witnessing Queenie’s fierce outburst toward Eddie and his devastated reaction to it, finally realizes they are in love. She berates Eddie for letting Queenie run away and tells him to go after her. She claims to never have loved him and that she’d only been using him to advance her career. After he leaves she breaks down and alternates between sobs and hysterical laughter. She composes herself enough to call Uncle Jed to accept the job with the 30-week show.

There’s a raucous party at the apartment Jock had recently purchased for Queenie but he insists they spend time alone. When she resists his advances he says it’s the least she could do after all he’s done for her. He begins to get physical but Eddie bursts in and attempts to fight Jock, who knocks him through the door with one punch. Queenie runs to Eddie and leaves Jock and the party behind.

Sometime later, Hank and Uncle Jed await the arrival of Queenie and Eddie from their honeymoon. The relationship between the sisters is on the mend but there is obvious discomfort between Hank and Eddie. Queenie announces she’s through with show business and will settle down in their new house on Long Island. She insists that Hank lives with them when her job is over. After Hank leaves with her new partner and Uncle Jed, Queenie laments the fact that her sister hasn’t found the happiness she deserves. The final scene is of a distraught Hank on her way to the train station.

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1929

“Alibi”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Alibi is a 1929 American crime film directed by Roland West. The screenplay was written by West and C. Gardner Sullivan, who adapted the 1927 Broadway stage play, Nightstick, written by Elaine Sterne Carrington, J.C. Nugent, Elliott Nugent and John Wray.[1]

Alternate titles for the film include The Perfect Alibi and Nightstick.

The movie is a crime melodrama starring Chester Morris, Harry Stubbs, Mae Busch and Eleanore Griffith. Director West experimented a great deal with sound, music, and camera angles.

The film was nominated for three Academy Awards, including one for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Chester Morris), Best Art Direction (William Cameron Menzies) and Best Picture.

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1929

“The Hollywood Revue of 1929”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Hollywood Revue of 1929 is a 1929 part Technicolor Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer American musical-comedy film. It was the studio’s second feature-length musical, and one of the earliest ventures into the talkie format. Produced by Harry Rapf and directed by Chuck Riesner, the film brought together some of MGM’s most popular performers in a lavish two-hour revue. The two masters of ceremonies are Conrad Nagel and Jack Benny. A month after this movie, Warner Brothers released The Show of Shows, a musical revue which was photographed almost entirely in Technicolor and a full talking picture.

Unlike M-G-M’s imposing feature films, which always boasted strong story values, The Hollywood Revue of 1929 was a plotless parade of variety acts. Conrad Nagel, interviewed for the book “The Real Tinsel”, recalled, “Everybody thought Harry Rapf was crazy for making it.” Billed as an “All-Star Musical Extravaganza,” the film includes performances by once and future stars, including Joan Crawford singing and dancing on stage. (She later remarked, “Revue was one of those let’s-throw-everyone-on-the-lot-into-a musical things, but I did a good song-and-dance number.”[citation needed]). Other segments feature Lionel Barrymore, Marion Davies, Gus Edwards, John Gilbert, Buster Keaton, Marie Dressler, Anita Page, Norma Shearer, and the comedy team of Karl Dane and George K. Arthur. Highlights of the film are a comedy routine starring Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy as inept magicians, and a variety of musical performances. One of these is the debut of “Singin’ in the Rain,” performed initially by Cliff Edwards as “Ukelele Ike,'” and later performed at the end of the film by the entire cast. This latter all-star color sequence was a last-minute addition to the film, shot late at night on June 10, 1929, just ten days before the premiere at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre. The only major M-G-M stars missing from the revue are Greta Garbo, Ramón Novarro, and Lon Chaney, Sr., although Chaney is referred to by name in one of the songs performed. Only one sequence was cut from the film: three songs by The Brox Sisters, which was recycled into a short subject, Gems of MGM. Another sequence, a parody of the Albertina Rasch ballet’s “pearl dance” by Marie Dressler, was planned but not shot (as the film’s production records reveal). Instead, the number was replaced by one featuring Buster Keaton, though Dressler did pose for stills wearing a Lady Godiva wig.

The film is sometimes cited, as on the DVD release of the 1952 Singin’ in the Rain, as the movie that led to the downfall of Gilbert’s career. Gilbert, a popular silent film actor best known for his work opposite Garbo, possessed a pleasant tenor speaking voice which didn’t always match his heroic, dashing screen image. In Hollywood Revue he plays the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet with Norma Shearer, first straight, then for laughs with contemporary slang.

The film was popular with audiences, especially in its initial big-city engagements, and received an Academy Award nomination for Best Picture. Producer Rapf tried to follow it up with another revue, The Hollywood Revue of 1930, which was changed during production to The March of Time, and finally abandoned. Musical numbers already shot for the film were edited into M-G-M short subjects of the early 1930s.

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1929

“In Old Arizona”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

In Old Arizona is a 1929 American Western film directed by Irving Cummings and Raoul Walsh, nominated for five Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The film, which was based on the character of the Cisco Kid in the story The Caballero’s Way by O. Henry, was a major innovation in Hollywood: it was the first major Western to use the new technology of sound and the first talkie to be filmed outdoors. The film made extensive use of authentic locations, filming in Bryce Canyon National Park and Zion National Park in Utah and the San Fernando Mission and the Mojave Desert in California. The movie was released on January 20, 1929 (wide); (Dec. 25, 1928 Los Angeles Premiere).

In Old Arizona was also instrumental in developing the image of the singing cowboy, with its star, Warner Baxter, singing My Tonia. Baxter went on to win the Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance. Other actors included Edmund Lowe, Dorothy Burgess and J. Farrell MacDonald,

Other nominations included Best Director for Irving Cummings, Best Writing for Tom Barry Best Cinematography for Arthur Edeson, and Best Picture.

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EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1929

“The Patriot”:

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Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Patriot is a 1928 semi-biographical film that was directed by Ernst Lubitsch and released by Paramount Pictures. The film was written by Hanns Kräly ; it is an adaptation of several different plays: Paul I by Dmitri Merezhkovsky, Der Patriot by Alfred Neumann, and The Patriot by Ashley Dukes. The movie is a biographical story of Tsar Paul I of Russia, starring Emil Jannings, Florence Vidor and Lewis Stone.

Only pieces of this film are left; there is no complete copy. It is the only Best Picture Academy Award nominee for which no complete or near-complete copy exists.

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