Archive

Archive for September 18, 2011

EYE-BALL MovieZone – Oscar Movies 1952 …

September 18, 2011 Comments off
The-EYE-BALL-MovieZone
EYE-BALL MovieZone –
Oscar Movies 1952:
EYE-BALL MovieZoneThe Nominees for the Best Picture in 1952 were:

1952 Nominees:

[Oscar Best Picture Winner – highlighted – click Nominee Movie links provided to navigate your way up and down the page – each Movie has additional links to Bit Torrent “downloads’ links, Wikipedia Links for all the information about the nominated movie, and the EYE-BALL MovieZone Reviews and ratings.]

Movie Links:

Please Report any broken LINKS – E-Mail – blogcomment@bigpond.com

________________________________________

EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1952

“The Greatest Show on Earth”:

Movie Links:

Please Report any broken LINKS –

E-Mail – blogcomment@bigpond.com

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Brad Braden is the no-nonsense general manager of what was at the time the world’s largest railroad circus. He has a number of problems on his hands for the upcoming season.

The show’s board of directors plan to run a short 10 week season rather than risk losing $25,000 a day in a shaky post-war economy. Brad bargains to keep the circus on the road as long as it is making a profit, thus keeping the 1,400 performers and roustabouts who make Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus’ the Greatest Show On Earth working.

Brad’s first problem is having to tell his girlfriend, Holly, a flyer who has no idea who she is in love with and who had been expecting to be the star of that season’s show, that she’s out of the center ring. The only way he was able to get management to agree to a full season was to hire The Great Sebastian, “the debonaire King of the Air” and world-class trapeze artist, as the star of the show. Holly knows Brad must think of the show first and personal feelings second, and that he does not take chances with the show, but is nevertheless infuriated at his decision.

His second problem is keeping Sebastian under control. He has a well-deserved reputation as a ladies’ man who has cut a wide swath through the female contingent of every show he’s ever worked in, to the detriment of the shows’ operations.

His third problem is keeping an eye on Harry, a midway concessionaire he suspects of running crooked games of chance, who works for a mysterious gangster named Mr. Henderson (who has a healthy respect for Brad Braden and not much for Harry).

Another situation unbeknownst to Brad involves the beloved Buttons the Clown, who is never seen without his makeup. During a performance, Buttons converses with a woman member of the audience — who warns him that an unnamed “they” are asking questions about him again. She is in fact his mother and they see each other only once a year. Hints about his former life are revealed as he gives first aid to performers and wraps bandages around a trapeze for Holly in an expert manner. Holly later finds a newspaper article about a doctor who had “mercy killed” his wife.

The competition between Holly and Sebastian for the center ring develops into a romantic triangle as well, with both Sebastian and Brad vying for Holly as the aerialists’ acts become increasingly daring and dangerous. Sebastian ignores his former lovers on the show: Angel, who performs in the elephant act; and Phyllis, who does a double turn as an iron jaw artist and a vocalist starring in a South Seas spectacular built around her talent as a singer. The duel ends when, in response to a challenge from Holly, Sebastian removes his safety net and suffers serious injuries in a fall when a trick goes wrong. Buttons tends to him, and when a doctor expresses admiration for the way he dealt with the injuries the clown explains, a little nervously, that he used to be a pharmacist’s mate. Holly finally has the center ring and star billing — but not the way she wanted it. Brad is unable to comfort her because she is in love with Sebastian.

One problem at least is resolved. When Harry is caught cheating circus attendees on the midway, Brad call him on it and fires him, finishing the fight Harry started by throwing him into a puddle of mud. Harry leaves the lot, vowing revenge. He is seen now and then on the periphery of the show, shooting craps and sowing disaffection, particularly with Klaus the elephant trainer who is obsessed with Angel, one of the “ballet girls” (female performers whose primary job is to look beautiful, as opposed to performing a specialty act) who works with his elephants as “the Sultan’s Favorite.”

Sebastian rejoins the show, but is unable to return to the trapeze due to an injury which has left him with a useless right arm. A guilt-ridden Holly professes her love for her former rival over the cold, unfeeling Brad. Calling Holly a fool “for busting up the swellest guy in the circus,” Angel makes a pass at Brad and they become an item. This sits badly with Klaus, who has spent the entire season pursuing Angel and cannot accept that she is not in love with him and does not want him.

As they are about to leave one stand, Special Agent Gregory of the FBI intercepts Brad, asking if the circus doctor looked like a photograph a man he is hunting (the photo is of Buttons without makeup). Having never seen Buttons without makeup, Brad doesn’t recognize the man in the photo. The detective boards the train to continue his investigation. Brad mentions this to Buttons, who tells him that Sebastian has feeling in his injured hand — a sign that his disability is not permanent. Brad makes the connection between Buttons and the fugitive doctor and comments that the police will be taking fingerprints. The implication is that Buttons should make himself scarce until the detective leaves the show to search elsewhere.

The joy of Sebastian’s potential recovery is overshadowed by a spectacular collision of the circus’ two trains, set up by Harry the crooked midway operator fired by Brad and Angel’s rejected suitor, Klaus, as a byproduct of their robbing the circus pay wagon of the money earned by the show at the last stand. Buttons, who had been about to flee, returns after a plea from Holly, who like Brad had made the connection between the doctor “who killed the think he loved, then vanished” and his new identity as Buttons the Clown and saves the critically injured Brad’s life by giving a Blood transfusion from Sebastian “on the fly” despite knowing that Gregory is watching. This in turn leads to Gregory reluctantly arresting Buttons, who he declares “is all right.”

Holly realizes that she is actually in love with Brad, that she has always loved him; and takes command of the show, mounting a circus parade through the town nearest the crash and staging an open air show by the crash site (as the Big Top and lighting were lost in the wreck). Brad’s near-death experience forces him to admit that he is in love with Holly, but ironically she now hasn’t time for him because the show must go on. The last loose end is tied up when Sebastian proposes to Angel and she accepts. The movie ends with the troupe mounting a “spec” to open their improvised performance, which will keep the show in the black and enable them to continue their tour, a magnificent recovery from disaster.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

A bold and big extavaganza to bring the Circus world to teh Movies – Heston is believable but the movie fails on so many levels – its saving grace is the love interest of an old flame and the daughter she bore …

Worth a look if you have not see it before …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 5.0/10 …

Back to Top

________________________________________

EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1952

“High Noon”:

Movie Links:

Please Report any broken LINKS –

E-Mail – blogcomment@bigpond.com

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Will Kane (Gary Cooper), the longtime marshal of Hadleyville, New Mexico Territory, has just married pacifist Quaker Amy (Grace Kelly) and turned in his badge. He intends to become a storekeeper elsewhere. Suddenly, the town learns that Frank Miller (Ian MacDonald)—a criminal Kane brought to justice—is due to arrive on the noon train.

Miller had been sentenced to hang but was pardoned on an unspecified legal technicality. In court, he had vowed to get revenge on Kane and anyone else who got in the way. Miller’s three gang members, including his younger brother Ben (Sheb Wooley), wait for him at the station.

Kane and his wife leave town, but fearing that the gang will hunt him down and be a danger to the townspeople, Kane turns back. He reclaims his badge and scours the town for help, even interrupting Sunday church services, with little success. His deputy, Harvey Pell (Lloyd Bridges), resigns because Kane did not recommend him as the new marshal.

Kane goes to warn Helen Ramírez (Katy Jurado), first Frank Miller’s lover, then Kane’s, and now Harvey’s. Aware of what Miller will do to her if he finds her, she quickly sells her business and prepares to leave town.

Amy gives her husband an ultimatum: she is leaving on the noon train, with or without him.

The worried townspeople encourage Kane to leave, hoping that would defuse the situation. Even Kane’s good friends the Fullers are at odds about how to deal with the situation. Mildrid Fuller (Eve McVeagh) wants her husband (Harry Morgan) to speak with Kane when he comes to their home, but he makes her claim he is not home.

In the end, Kane faces the Miller Gang alone. Kane guns down two of the gang, though he himself is wounded in the process. Helen Ramirez and Amy both board the train (pulled by the famous locomotive, Sierra No. 3), but Amy gets off when she hears the sound of gunfire. Amy chooses her husband’s life over her religious beliefs, shooting Pierce from behind. Frank then takes her hostage to force Kane into the open. However, Amy suddenly attacks Frank, giving Kane a clear shot, and Kane shoots Frank Miller dead. As the townspeople emerge, Kane contemptuously throws his marshal’s star in the dirt and leaves town with his wife.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Grace Kelly gives a stron performance … Cooper also … Worth a look if you like dading Cowboy movies …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 4.5/10 …

Back to Top

________________________________________

EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1952

“Ivanhoe”:

Movie Links:

Please Report any broken LINKS –

E-Mail – blogcomment@bigpond.com

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Richard the Lionheart (Norman Wooland), King of England, vanishes while returning from the Crusades. One of his knights, the Saxon Wilfred of Ivanhoe (Robert Taylor), searches tirelessly for him, finally finding him being held for ransom by Leopold of Austria for the enormous sum of 150,000 marks of silver. Richard’s treacherous brother, Prince John (Guy Rolfe), knows about it, but enjoys ruling in his absence.

Ivanhoe returns to England, to the house of his estranged father, Cedric (Finlay Currie), to be reunited with his love and Cedric’s ward, the Lady Rowena (Joan Fontaine), and to beg his father’s help in raising the ransom. Cedric refuses to help a Norman king and orders his son to leave. Wamba (Emlyn Williams), Cedric’s court jester, begs to go with Ivanhoe and is made his squire.

Two separate parties of travellers arrive and are granted Cedric’s hospitality: a Jew, Isaac of York (Felix Aylmer), and Norman knights Sir Brian de Bois-Guilbert (George Sanders) and Sir Hugh de Bracy (Robert Douglas), and their entourage. That night, two of the Normans try to rob Isaac, but are foiled by Ivanhoe. Not feeling safe, Isaac decides to return to his home in Sheffield; Ivanhoe offers to escort him there.

When they reach Isaac’s home, Ivanhoe secures his help raising the ransom in return for better treatment for the Jews once Richard returns. Rebecca (Elizabeth Taylor), Isaac’s daughter, visits Ivanhoe secretly in the night to reward him for rescuing her father; she gives him jewels to purchase arms and a horse for an important upcoming joust. She falls in love with him, despite the great social gulf between them.

Nearly everyone of note is at the tournament, including Prince John. Norman knights loyal to him defeat all comers. Just when it seems that they are victorious, a mysterious new Saxon knight appears, arrayed all in black, with white trim, his face hidden behind his visor. He does not give his name, but challenges all five Norman champions. He easily defeats the first three, Malvoisin, Ralph, and Front de Boeuf (Francis de Wolff), one after the other, and also wins the fourth bout against de Bracy, but is seriously wounded in the shoulder. He is soon identified by many as Ivanhoe. When Ivanhoe salutes Rebecca after his first victory, Bois-Guilbert is immediately smitten by her beauty. In the last joust against Bois-Guilbert, the weakened Ivanhoe falls from his horse. He is carried off, to be tended to by Rebecca.

Fearing Prince John’s wrath, the Saxons depart; Ivanhoe is taken to the woods under the protection of Robin Hood (Harold Warrender). The rest make for the city of York, but are captured and taken to the castle of Front de Boeuf. When Ivanhoe hears the news, he gives himself up, in exchange for his father’s freedom. However, the Normans go back on their word and keep them both. Robin Hood’s men then storm the castle, freeing most of the captives. In the fighting, de Boeuf drives Wamba to his death in a burning part of the castle and is slain in turn by Ivanhoe. Bois-Guilbert alone escapes, by using Rebecca as a shield, while de Bracy is defeated and captured by Ivanhoe after attempting to do the same with Rowena.

Meanwhile, the enormous ransom is finally collected, but the Jews face a cruel choice: free either Richard or Rebecca, for Prince John has set the price of her life at 100,000 marks, the Jews’ contribution. Isaac chooses Richard. Ivanhoe entrusts the ransom delivery to Cedric, but promises Isaac that he will rescue Rebecca.

John has her condemned to be burned at the stake as a witch, but Ivanhoe appears and challenges the verdict, invoking the right to “wager of battle,” which cannot be denied. Prince John chooses the conflicted Bois-Guilbert as his champion. The Norman makes a last desperate plea to Rebecca: in return for her love, he is willing to forfeit the duel, though he would be forever disgraced as a knight. She refuses, saying “We are all in God’s hands, sir knight.”

In the battle to the death, Ivanhoe’s axe prevails over Bois-Guilbert’s mace and chain. As he lies dying, Bois-Guilbert reaffirms to Rebecca that he is the one who loves her, not Ivanhoe. Rebecca accepts that Ivanhoe’s heart has always belonged to Rowena, and Richard and his knights (with Cedric as an escort) return to reclaim his throne from his usurping brother.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Robert Taylor and Elizabeth Taylor play the forbidden love interest – he a Christian and she a Jew – Set in medieval times when Robin Hood and King Richard save the day – Ivanhoe [Taylor] – plays the hero with tewo women swooning over him – it’s a shallow story with period costumes adding value – Robert Taylor was never a natural actor – but Elizabeth Taylor is genuine and steals the scenes she plays … the bad guys are believable and of course they all get their’s in the end and Ivanhoe gets his bride – not the Jew [Taylor] …

Good viewing if you like the medieval theme … and Elizabeth Taylor is worth the effort.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 5.0/10 …

Back to Top

________________________________________

EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1952

“Moulin Rouge”:

Movie Links:

Please Report any broken LINKS –

E-Mail – blogcomment@bigpond.com

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

In Paris in 1890, as crowds pour into the Moulin Rouge nightclub, young artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (José Ferrer) finishes a bottle of cognac and sketches the dancers as they perform. The nightclub’s regulars each stop by: singer Jane Avril (Zsa Zsa Gabor) teases Henri charmingly, dancers La Goulue (Katherine Kath) and Aicha (Muriel Smith) fight, and owner Maurice Joyant (Lee Montague) offers Henri free drinks for a month in exchange for painting a promotional poster. At closing time, Henri waits for the crowds to disperse before standing to reveal his four-foot, six-inch body. As he walks to his Montmartre apartment, he recalls the events that led to his disfigurement: Henri is a bright, happy child, revered by his father, the Count de Toulouse-Lautrec. When he falls down a flight of stairs, however, his legs fail to heal, a genetic weakness that stems from the fact that his parents are first cousins. His legs stunted and pained, Henri loses himself in his art, while his father soon leaves the countess to ensure they will have no more children. As a young adult, Henri proposes to the woman he loves but, when she tells him no woman will ever love him, he leaves his childhood home in despair to begin a new life as a painter in Paris.

Back in the present, street walker Marie Charlet (Colette Marchand) begs Henri to rescue her from police sergeant Patou (Georges Lannes). Henri wards off the policeman by pretending to be her guardian, after which she insists on following him home. There, she addresses his small stature, and although he is at first angry, he allows her to stay out of his desperate loneliness and is charmed when she claims not to care about his legs. Within days, he is buying her gifts and singing as he paints, until Marie takes his money and stays out all night. Henri waits in agony for her return, but when she finally does tells her to leave at once. Realizing that he loves her, she vows to stay and love him back. Although she continues to fight petulantly with him, he tells himself that her crassness stems from her poverty and lets her stay. During one fight, however, she announces that he can never attract a real woman and leaves. By morning, she begs him to take her back, but he refuses. He begins drinking and does not stop until his landlady calls his mother, who urges him to save his health by finding Marie.

He searches her working-class neighborhood, finally discovering her at a café, where she drunkenly reveals that she stayed with him only to procure money for her boyfriend. When she adds that his touch made her sick, he returns to his apartment and turns on the gas vents. As he sits waiting to die, he is suddenly inspired to finish his Moulin Rouge poster, and, brush in hand, distractedly turns the vents off again. The next day, he brings the poster to the dance hall, and although the style is unusual Maurice accepts it. Henri works for days at the lithographers, blending his own inks to perfect the vivid colors. When he finishes, the poster, which shows a woman dancing with her legs exposed, becomes an instant sensation and the dance hall opens to high society. The count, however, denounces Henri for the “pornographic” work.

Over the next ten years, Henri records Parisian life in countless brilliant paintings. By 1900, he is famous but still terribly lonely. One day, he sees Myriamme Hyam (Suzanne Flon) standing by the Seine River and, thinking she may jump, stops to talk to her. She spurns his advances and throws a key into the water. Days later, Jane, a friend of Myriamme’s, arranges a meeting for them. Myriamme is a great admirer of Henri’s paintings, and the two begin to spend time together. Eventually, she reveals that the key she threw out belonged to a married man, Marne de la Voisier, who asked her to be his mistress. Although Henri continues to decry the possibility of true love, he nonetheless falls in love with Myriamme. One day, they see La Goulue on the street drunkenly insisting that she was once a star, and Henri realizes that once the Moulin Rouge became respectable it could no longer be home to misfits.

Myriamme later informs Henri that Marne has asked her to marry him. Certain that she loves the more handsome man, he bitingly congratulates her for trapping Marne. Even after she asks if he loves her, Henri believes she is only trying to spare his feelings and lies that he does not. By the time he receives a letter stating that she loves him but cannot wait any longer, she has already left the city and he cannot find her. Weeks later, he is still drinking steadily and reading her note over and over. He is helped home one night by Patou, now an inspector, but once home, Henri, in a state of delirium tremens, hallucinates that he sees cockroaches and, in trying to drive them away, accidentally falls down a flight of stairs. Near death, he is brought to his family home. After the priest reads the last rites, the count tearfully informs Henri that he is to be the first living artist to be shown in the Louvre and begs for forgiveness. Henri turns his head and watches as phantasmal characters from his Moulin Rouge paintings, including Jane Avril, dance into the room to bid him goodbye.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Not my type of movie – still to watch it all the way through …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 3.0/10 …

Back to Top

________________________________________

EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1952

“The Quiet Man”:

Movie Links:

Please Report any broken LINKS –

E-Mail – blogcomment@bigpond.com

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Set in 1920s Ireland, Sean Thornton (John Wayne), an Irish-born American from Pittsburgh, returns to Ireland to reclaim his family’s farm in Innisfree. He meets and falls in love with the fiery Mary Kate Danaher (Maureen O’Hara), the spinster sister of the bullying, loud-mouthed landowner “Red” Will Danaher (Victor McLaglen). Danaher, angry that Sean outbid him for the Thornton land adjacent to his property, initially refuses to sanction the marriage until several town locals, including the parish priest, conspire to trick him into believing that the wealthy Widow Tillane (Mildred Natwick) wants to marry him, but only if Mary Kate is no longer living in the house. After learning the truth on Sean and Mary Kate’s wedding day, an enraged Will refuses to give his sister her full dowry.

Sean, unschooled in Irish customs, cares nothing about the dowry, but Mary Kate is obsessed with obtaining it, the dowry representing her independence, identity, and pride. Angered and shamed by Sean’s refusal to confront her brother and demand what is legally hers, she brands him a coward, and, despite living together, they are estranged as husband and wife.

Sean is a former boxer in the United States, a heavyweight challenger known as “Trooper Thorn.” After accidentally killing an opponent in the ring, Sean hung up his gloves, vowing never to fight again. The truth about Sean, however, is known only to one other person in the village, the Church of Ireland minister Rev. Playfair (Arthur Shields).

Later, in an attempt to force Sean to confront Will Danaher, Mary Kate leaves him and boards a train departing Castletown and headed to Dublin. Infuriated, Sean arrives and drags her off the train, and, followed by the townspeople, forces her to walk the five miles to Inisfree from Castletown to Will Danaher’s farm. Sean demands that Will hand over her dowry and threatens to return Mary Kate to his household if Will refuses. Will finally relents and gives him the cash. Mary Kate and Sean throw it into a furnace, showing that Mary Kate never cared about the money, but only that Sean stand up for his wife. Sean and Will slug it out through the village, stop for a drink, brawl again, then become best friends. Sean regains Mary Kate’s love and respect. Will Danaher and the Widow Tillane begin courting, and peace is returned to Innisfree.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

One of John Wayne’s four Oscar Nominated Best Picture movies the others being “Stagecoach” – 1939, “The Alamo” – 1960, and “The Longest Day” – 1962. He made several movies with Maureen O’Hara and this is one of the better ones. Wayne is out of his cowboy outfits and into a retired boxed looking for his roots in bonny Ireland. It’s a love story – another new direction for Wayne and without O’Hara playing the fiesty spinster wanting a husband – Wayne could never have pulled it off.

The movie was enjoyable to watch – just to see Wayne out of his comfort zone …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: 5.0/10 …

Back to Top

________________________________________

[Just a small note – this is a free website – and the information posted hereto is the product of genuine research which has taken considerable time and effort. If you have enjoyed the product of these efforts a small donation would be appreciated. There is a gratuity/donation link provided to the right of this text – please if you have the time and are so inclined to want to make a donation – please use the link provided. All funds received are thankfully received and they go a long way to help maintain the content of this site.]

All EYE-BALL MovieZone Links:

Please Report any broken LINKS – E-Mail – blogcomment@bigpond.com

Back to Top

________________________________________

The EYE-BALL MovieZone …

Advertisements

EYE-BALL MovieZone – Oscar Movies 1929 …

September 18, 2011 Comments off
The-EYE-BALL-MovieZone
EYE-BALL MovieZone –
Oscar Movies 1929:
EYE-BALL MovieZoneThe Nominees for the Best Picture in 1929 were:

1929 Nominees:

[Oscar Best Picture Winner – highlighted – click Nominee Movie links provided to navigate your way up and down the page – each Movie has additional links to Bit Torrent “downloads’ links, Wikipedia Links for all the information about the nominated movie, and the EYE-BALL MovieZone Reviews and ratings.]

Movie Links:

________________________________________

EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1929

“The Broadway Melody”:

Movie Links:

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Broadway Melody (also known as The Broadway Melody of 1929[1]) is a 1929 American musical film and the first sound film to win an Academy Award for Best Picture. It was one of the first musicals to feature a Technicolor sequence, which sparked the trend of color being used in a flurry of musicals that would hit the screens in 1929-1930. Today the Technicolor sequence is presumed lost and only a black and white copy survives in the complete film. The film was the first musical released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and was Hollywood’s first all-talking musical.

The film was written by Norman Houston and James Gleason from a story by Edmund Goulding, and directed by Harry Beaumont. Original music was written by Arthur Freed and Nacio Herb Brown, including the popular hit “You Were Meant For Me”. The George M. Cohan classic “Give My Regards To Broadway” is used under the opening establishing shots of New York City, its film debut. Bessie Love was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance.

The plot involves the romances of musical comedy stars, set against the backstage hubbub of a Broadway revue. Anita Page and Bessie Love play a vaudeville sister act who have come to New York for their big break on Broadway. Charles King plays the song-and-dance man whose affection for one sister (Harriet alias Hank) is supplanted by his growing love for the younger, more beautiful sister (Queenie). Queenie tries to protect her sister and derail the love triangle by dating a wealthy but unscrupulous “stage door Johnny.”

The movie opens with Eddie Kearns debuting “The Broadway Melody.” He tells some chorus girls he’s brought the Mahoney Sisters to New York to perform it with him in Francis Zanfield’s latest revue. Hank and Queenie Mahoney are awaiting Eddie’s arrival at their apartment. Hank, the older sister, prides herself on her business sense and talent while Queenie is lauded for her beauty. Hank is confident they will make it big while Queenie is less eager to put everything on the line to be stars. Their Uncle Jed arrives to tell them he’s gotten them a job with a 30-week traveling show. Hank tells him they’re not interested but he says he’ll give them time to think it over.

Eddie, who is engaged to Hank, arrives and sees Queenie for the first time since she was a girl and is instantly taken with her. He tells them to come to rehearsal for Zanfield’s revue to present their act. Zanfield isn’t interested in it but says he might have a use for Queenie, who begs him to give Hank a part as well. She also convinces him to pretend Hank’s business skills won him over. Eddie witnesses this exchange and becomes even more enamored of Queenie for her devotion to her sister. During dress rehearsal for the revue Zanfield says the pacing is too slow for “The Broadway Melody” and cuts Hank and Queenie from the number. Meanwhile, another girl is injured after falling off a prop and Queenie is selected to replace her. Nearly everyone is captivated by Queenie, particularly notorious playboy Jacques “Jock” Warriner. While Jock begins to woo Queenie, Hank is upset that Queenie is building her success on her looks rather than her talent.

Over the next couple weeks Queenie spends a lot time with Jock, of which Hank and Eddie fervently disapprove. They forbid her from seeing him, which results in Queenie pushing them away and deterioration of the relationship between the sisters. Queenie is only with Jock to fight growing feelings for Eddie but Hank thinks she’s setting herself up to be hurt. Eventually, Eddie and Queenie confess their love for each other but Queenie, unwilling to break her sister’s heart, runs off to Jock once again.

Hank, after witnessing Queenie’s fierce outburst toward Eddie and his devastated reaction to it, finally realizes they are in love. She berates Eddie for letting Queenie run away and tells him to go after her. She claims to never have loved him and that she’d only been using him to advance her career. After he leaves she breaks down and alternates between sobs and hysterical laughter. She composes herself enough to call Uncle Jed to accept the job with the 30-week show.

There’s a raucous party at the apartment Jock had recently purchased for Queenie but he insists they spend time alone. When she resists his advances he says it’s the least she could do after all he’s done for her. He begins to get physical but Eddie bursts in and attempts to fight Jock, who knocks him through the door with one punch. Queenie runs to Eddie and leaves Jock and the party behind.

Sometime later, Hank and Uncle Jed await the arrival of Queenie and Eddie from their honeymoon. The relationship between the sisters is on the mend but there is obvious discomfort between Hank and Eddie. Queenie announces she’s through with show business and will settle down in their new house on Long Island. She insists that Hank lives with them when her job is over. After Hank leaves with her new partner and Uncle Jed, Queenie laments the fact that her sister hasn’t found the happiness she deserves. The final scene is of a distraught Hank on her way to the train station.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Not Yet Reviewed …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: Not Yet Rated …

Back to Top

________________________________________

EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1929

“Alibi”:

Movie Links:

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Alibi is a 1929 American crime film directed by Roland West. The screenplay was written by West and C. Gardner Sullivan, who adapted the 1927 Broadway stage play, Nightstick, written by Elaine Sterne Carrington, J.C. Nugent, Elliott Nugent and John Wray.[1]

Alternate titles for the film include The Perfect Alibi and Nightstick.

The movie is a crime melodrama starring Chester Morris, Harry Stubbs, Mae Busch and Eleanore Griffith. Director West experimented a great deal with sound, music, and camera angles.

The film was nominated for three Academy Awards, including one for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Chester Morris), Best Art Direction (William Cameron Menzies) and Best Picture.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Not Yet Reviewed …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: Not Yet Rated …

Back to Top

________________________________________

EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1929

“The Hollywood Revue of 1929”:

Movie Links:

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Hollywood Revue of 1929 is a 1929 part Technicolor Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer American musical-comedy film. It was the studio’s second feature-length musical, and one of the earliest ventures into the talkie format. Produced by Harry Rapf and directed by Chuck Riesner, the film brought together some of MGM’s most popular performers in a lavish two-hour revue. The two masters of ceremonies are Conrad Nagel and Jack Benny. A month after this movie, Warner Brothers released The Show of Shows, a musical revue which was photographed almost entirely in Technicolor and a full talking picture.

Unlike M-G-M’s imposing feature films, which always boasted strong story values, The Hollywood Revue of 1929 was a plotless parade of variety acts. Conrad Nagel, interviewed for the book “The Real Tinsel”, recalled, “Everybody thought Harry Rapf was crazy for making it.” Billed as an “All-Star Musical Extravaganza,” the film includes performances by once and future stars, including Joan Crawford singing and dancing on stage. (She later remarked, “Revue was one of those let’s-throw-everyone-on-the-lot-into-a musical things, but I did a good song-and-dance number.”[citation needed]). Other segments feature Lionel Barrymore, Marion Davies, Gus Edwards, John Gilbert, Buster Keaton, Marie Dressler, Anita Page, Norma Shearer, and the comedy team of Karl Dane and George K. Arthur. Highlights of the film are a comedy routine starring Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy as inept magicians, and a variety of musical performances. One of these is the debut of “Singin’ in the Rain,” performed initially by Cliff Edwards as “Ukelele Ike,'” and later performed at the end of the film by the entire cast. This latter all-star color sequence was a last-minute addition to the film, shot late at night on June 10, 1929, just ten days before the premiere at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre. The only major M-G-M stars missing from the revue are Greta Garbo, Ramón Novarro, and Lon Chaney, Sr., although Chaney is referred to by name in one of the songs performed. Only one sequence was cut from the film: three songs by The Brox Sisters, which was recycled into a short subject, Gems of MGM. Another sequence, a parody of the Albertina Rasch ballet’s “pearl dance” by Marie Dressler, was planned but not shot (as the film’s production records reveal). Instead, the number was replaced by one featuring Buster Keaton, though Dressler did pose for stills wearing a Lady Godiva wig.

The film is sometimes cited, as on the DVD release of the 1952 Singin’ in the Rain, as the movie that led to the downfall of Gilbert’s career. Gilbert, a popular silent film actor best known for his work opposite Garbo, possessed a pleasant tenor speaking voice which didn’t always match his heroic, dashing screen image. In Hollywood Revue he plays the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet with Norma Shearer, first straight, then for laughs with contemporary slang.

The film was popular with audiences, especially in its initial big-city engagements, and received an Academy Award nomination for Best Picture. Producer Rapf tried to follow it up with another revue, The Hollywood Revue of 1930, which was changed during production to The March of Time, and finally abandoned. Musical numbers already shot for the film were edited into M-G-M short subjects of the early 1930s.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Not Yet Reviewed …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: Not Yet Rated …

Back to Top

________________________________________

EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1929

“In Old Arizona”:

Movie Links:

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

In Old Arizona is a 1929 American Western film directed by Irving Cummings and Raoul Walsh, nominated for five Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The film, which was based on the character of the Cisco Kid in the story The Caballero’s Way by O. Henry, was a major innovation in Hollywood: it was the first major Western to use the new technology of sound and the first talkie to be filmed outdoors. The film made extensive use of authentic locations, filming in Bryce Canyon National Park and Zion National Park in Utah and the San Fernando Mission and the Mojave Desert in California. The movie was released on January 20, 1929 (wide); (Dec. 25, 1928 Los Angeles Premiere).

In Old Arizona was also instrumental in developing the image of the singing cowboy, with its star, Warner Baxter, singing My Tonia. Baxter went on to win the Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance. Other actors included Edmund Lowe, Dorothy Burgess and J. Farrell MacDonald,

Other nominations included Best Director for Irving Cummings, Best Writing for Tom Barry Best Cinematography for Arthur Edeson, and Best Picture.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Not Yet Reviewed …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: Not Yet Rated …

Back to Top

________________________________________

EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1929

“The Patriot”:

Movie Links:

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Patriot is a 1928 semi-biographical film that was directed by Ernst Lubitsch and released by Paramount Pictures. The film was written by Hanns Kräly ; it is an adaptation of several different plays: Paul I by Dmitri Merezhkovsky, Der Patriot by Alfred Neumann, and The Patriot by Ashley Dukes. The movie is a biographical story of Tsar Paul I of Russia, starring Emil Jannings, Florence Vidor and Lewis Stone.

Only pieces of this film are left; there is no complete copy. It is the only Best Picture Academy Award nominee for which no complete or near-complete copy exists.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Not Yet Reviewed …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: Not Yet Rated …

Back to Top

________________________________________

[Just a small note – this is a free website – and the information posted hereto is the product of genuine research which has taken considerable time and effort. If you have enjoyed the product of these efforts a small donation would be appreciated. There is a gratuity/donation link provided to the right of this text – please if you have the time and are so inclined to want to make a donation – please use the link provided. All funds received are thankfully received and they go a long way to help maintain the content of this site.]

Links to all other EYE-BALL MovieZone Pages:

Please Report any broken LINKS –
E-Mail – blogcomment@bigpond.com

Back to Top

________________________________________

The EYE-BALL MovieZone …

EYE-BALL MovieZone – Oscar Movies 1928 …

September 18, 2011 Comments off
The-EYE-BALL-MovieZone
EYE-BALL MovieZone –
Oscar Movies 1928:
EYE-BALL MovieZoneThe Nominees for the Best Picture in 1928 were:

1928 Nominees:

[Oscar Best Picture Winner – highlighted – click Nominee Movie links provided to navigate your way up and down the page – each Movie has additional links to Bit Torrent “downloads’ links, Wikipedia Links for all the information about the nominated movie, and the EYE-BALL MovieZone Reviews and ratings.]

Movie Links:

________________________________________

EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1928

“Wings”:

Movie Links:

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Jack Powell (Rogers) and David Armstrong (Arlen) are rivals in the same small American town, both vying for the attentions of pretty Sylvia Lewis (Ralston). Jack fails to realize that “the girl next door”, Mary Preston (Bow), is desperately in love with him. The two young men both enlist to become combat pilots in the Air Service. When they leave for training camp, Jack mistakenly believes Sylvia prefers him. She actually prefers David and lets him know about her feelings, but is too kindhearted to turn down Jack’s affection.

Jack and David are billeted together. Their tent mate is Cadet White (Gary Cooper), but their acquaintance is all too brief; White is killed in an air crash the same day. Undaunted, the two men endure a rigorous training period, where they go from being enemies to best friends. Upon graduating, they are shipped off to France to fight the Germans.

Mary joins the war effort by becoming an ambulance driver. She later learns of Jack’s reputation as an ace and encounters him while on leave in Paris. She finds him, but he is too drunk to recognize her. She puts him to bed, but when two Military Police barge in while she is innocently changing from a borrowed dress back into her uniform in the same room, she is forced to resign and return to America.

The climax of the story comes with the epic Battle of Saint-Mihiel. David is shot down and presumed dead. However, he survives the crash landing, steals a German biplane, and heads for the Allied lines. By a tragic stroke of bad luck, he is spotted and shot down by Jack, who is bent on avenging his friend. When Jack lands to pick up a souvenir, he becomes distraught when he learns what he has done, but before David dies, he forgives his comrade.

With the end of the war, Jack returns home to a hero’s welcome. When he returns David’s effects to his grieving parents, David’s mother blames the war, not Jack, for her son’s death. Then, Jack is reunited with Mary and realizes he loves her.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Not Yet Reviewed …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: Not Yet Rated …

Back to Top

________________________________________

EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1928

“The Racket”:

Movie Links:

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

The Racket (1928) is an American crime film directed by Lewis Milestone and starring Thomas Meighan, Marie Prevost, Louis Wolheim, and George E. Stone. The film was produced by Howard Hughes, written by Bartlett Cormack and Tom Miranda, and was distributed by Paramount Pictures.

Due to the controversial portrayal of a corrupt police force and city government both the film and the play were banned at the time in Chicago.

Only one copy of the film is known to exist.[2] It was long thought lost before being located in Howard Hughes’ film collection after his death. A print was shepherded by Dr. Hart Wegner of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas film department for restoration by Jeffrey Masino, along with another lost Hughes-produced film, Two Arabian Knights (1927). In 2004 and 2006, Turner Classic Movies broadcast The Racket, Two Arabian Knights, and The Mating Call (1928), the first showing of any of the three films in decades.

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Not Yet Reviewed …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]: Not Yet Rated …

Back to Top

________________________________________

EYE-BALL MovieZoneReview – 1928

“Seventh Heaven”:

Movie Links:

Plot: [Pasted from Wikipedia] –

Seventh Heaven (1927) is a silent film and one of the first films to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture (then called “Best Picture, Production”). The film was written by H.H. Caldwell (titles), Benjamin Glazer, Katherine Hilliker (titles) and Austin Strong (play), and directed by Frank Borzage.

The movie is a romance starring Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell. Gaynor won the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role, Borzage won for Best Director and Glazer won for Best Writing, Adaptation.

Seventh Heaven is the 13th highest grossing silent film in cinema history, taking in more than $2.5 million at the box office in 1927.

In 1995, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Seventh Heaven was based on one of the most popular Broadway plays of the 1920s. A 1922 production that ran at Booth Theatre from October 30, 1922 to July 1924 for a total of 704 performances. The leads were played by George Gaul(Chico) and Helen Menken(Diane). Also in the cast of the play was Frank Morgan

EYE-BALL MovieZone Review …

Not Yet Reviewed …

EYE-BALL MovieZone Rating [scale 0-10]:  Not Yet Rated …

Back to Top

________________________________________

[Just a small note – this is a free website – and the information posted hereto is the product of genuine research which has taken considerable time and effort. If you have enjoyed the product of these efforts a small donation would be appreciated. There is a gratuity/donation link provided to the right of this text – please if you have the time and are so inclined to want to make a donation – please use the link provided. All funds received are thankfully received and they go a long way to help maintain the content of this site.]

Links to all other EYE-BALL MovieZone Pages:

Please Report any broken LINKS –
E-Mail – blogcomment@bigpond.com

Back to Top

________________________________________

The EYE-BALL MovieZone …

%d bloggers like this: